Who will be the weakest link in our 2020 MidYear Special?!

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About this episode

Welcome to our MidYear Special 2020!

It’s a COVID-style international spectacular for the eighth(!) annual RSP mid-season special. It’s time to play… the Weakest Link!

Join Andie Alexander, Jonathon O’Donnel, Titus Hjelm, Naomi Goldenberg, Sidney Castillo, Russell McCutcheon, Ray Radford, and Megan Goodwin as David Robertson fires questions at them and Chris Cotter remotely operates PowerPoint!

Who will win the coveted fictional research funding?

Aaron Hughes – we apologise in advance!

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