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Podcasts and Resources on the Contemporary Social-Scientific Study of Religion
On the Tantracization of Jain Ascetic Rituals

What is tantra? Why are some practices classified as tantric while others are not? How might we rethink this term and its application? To begin answer these questions, Dr. Ellen Gough (Emory University) joins Andie Alexander to discuss her forthcoming book, Making a Mantra: Tantric Ritual and Renunciation on the Jain Path to Liberation (University of Chicago Press 2021), where she examines how the category of tantra has been understood historically in Indian religious traditions and explores the “tantracization” of Jain ascetic practices.

On the Tantracization of Jain Ascetic Rituals

In the RSP’s first episode on Jainism, Dr. Ellen Gough joins Andie Alexander to discuss what she terms “tantracization,” a method for thinking about the process of establishing something as tantric.

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Sex Scandals and Minoritized Religions

What do Muslims, Mormons, and Satanists have in common? Megan Goodwin argues that for all three groups, sex scandals were used to paint religious groups as un-American and “bad” religion. Learn more about minoritization and its role in policing American identity in this week’s episode.

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Our Latest Response

Abusing Religion and the Importance of Refocusing Gazes

"One can refuse to be manipulated by sensationalist media priming the public to generate the outrage that will serve white supremacy," writes Abimbola Adelakun in this response to our interview with Megan Goodwin on the theory of contraceptive nationalism in her book Abusing Religion

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Climate marchers in Ghent with a banner that reads "save the world"

Telling Stories to Change the World

“How is a myth different from a story or narrative?” Susannah Crockford says the answer “shifts dramatically with different disciplinary definitions and assumptions.” Read on to learn why this matters in her response to our episode with Tim Stacey on “Myth-Making, Environmentalism, and Non-Religion”

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The views expressed in podcasts, features and responses are the views of the individual contributors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Religious Studies Project or our sponsors. The Religious Studies Project is produced by the Religious Studies Project Association (SCIO), a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (charity number SC047750).