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The Religious Studies Project
Podcasts and Resources on the Contemporary Social-Scientific Study of Religion
Mapping the Digital Study of Religion

In this episode, Dan Gorman speaks with Christopher Cantwell and Kristian Petersen about their anthology Digital Humanities and Research Methods in Religious Studies (2021), which is part of DeGruyter’s “Introductions to Digital Humanities—Religion” series. They discuss the ethics and management of ongoing Digital Humanities projects, the opportunities afforded by mapping technology for understanding religious life, and the question of whether digital projects are recognized as genuine scholarship.

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Mapping the Digital Study of Religion

Dan Gorman speaks with Christopher Cantwell and Kristian Petersen about the future of the digital study of religion.

More Podcasts

Deconstructing ‘Religion’ in Contemporary Japan

In this episode, Dr. Mitsutoshi Horii joins Andie Alexander to discuss his recent book, The Category of ‘Religion’ in Contemporary Japan: Shūkyō & Temple Buddhism, where he demonstrates the necessity for understanding how and why certain groups come to be classified as ‘religious’ in contemporary Japan.

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History Repeated: Religious Conspiracy Theories Then and Now

In this episode, Maxinne Connolly-Panagopoulus explores a range of Dr. Carmen Celestini’s work on conspiracy theories, Christian apocalyptic thought and its impacts on political systems in America. They discuss early antimasonic movements, white supremacists from Christian Identity Organisation and discuss the parallels between old and new conspiracy thought and try to understand what is driving people to these movements.

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Our Latest Response

Telling the “Back Stage” Stories of Men, Religious Work, and Play

Responding to our Season 10 episode with Alyssa Maldonado-Estrada, Kristy Nabhan-Warren furthers the discussion on inadvertent feminization of Catholic devotionalism and ways in which it can be reimagined.

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Climate strike in Melbourne, AUS. Person holding sign with Simpson's quote "Won't somebody please think of the children!"

The Cycle of Conspiracy Theories

In his response to our interview with Carmen Celestini, Raymond Radford builds on Celestini’s discussion of conspiracy theories as “history repeated” in his analysis of social responses to pandemics “then and now.”

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“A Jesus Before Paul?”

Kicking off our Season 11 Response essays, Robyn Faith Walsh builds on Willi Braun’s discussion of the emphasis on origins in New Testament studies to explore the strategic use and employment of Paul’s letters in the history of Christianity.

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The views expressed in podcasts, features and responses are the views of the individual contributors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Religious Studies Project or our sponsors. The Religious Studies Project is produced by the Religious Studies Project Association (SCIO), a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (charity number SC047750).