Exploring contemporary issues in the
academic study of religion through podcasts.

The Religious Studies Project is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organization (SCIO) devoted to producing engaging and accessible resources for the contemporary study of religion.

Since 2012, our weekly podcast and written response essays have featured hundreds of scholars sharing their research and expertise in religious studies.

 Use our resources including new playlists to help you pursue some of the major questions in religious studies.

Explore our archive of 300 podcasts. Listen or read transcripts. Go deeper with scholarly responses.

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The Religious Studies Project
The Religious Studies Project

Podcasts and Resources on the Contemporary Social-Scientific Study of Religion

Queens of the World | Discourse! October 2022

This month’s Discourse! welcomes back Founding Editor Chris Cotter to the host’s chair, along with guests Ting Guo and Carmen Celestini. They first discuss Queen Elizabeth II and “mourning” in Hong Kong, and then more broadly. This segues neatly into a conversation about the Filipino conspiracist who has dubbed herself the “Queen of Canada”. They talk about the Iranian protests, and “compulsory hijabs”. Finally, they have a wee rant about how religion and spirituality is presented in mental health surveys.

Queens of the World | Discourse! October 2022

This month's Discourse! welcomes back Founding Editor Chris Cotter to the host's chair, along with guests Ting Guo and Carmen Celestini. They first discuss Queen Elizabeth II and “mourning” in Hong Kong, and then more broadly. This segues neatly into a conversation about the Filipino conspiracist who has dubbed herself the “Queen of Canada”. They talk about the Iranian protests, and "compulsory hijabs". Finally, they have a wee rant about how religion and spirituality is presented in mental health surveys.

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Secular Spaces? | Discourse! September 2022

This month’s Discourse! centres on questions of the secular and the religious in the contemporary public square. What does it mean to be a secular space? How do institutions “deal with” religious ideas and identities in such a space? We talk about religious bias in universities, how religious spokespeople affect politics, and how religious freedom sometimes trumps other forms of freedom. Tune in with host Jacob Barrett and guests Richard Irvine and Jacob Noblett to learn more!

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Reflections on REF 2021

In this week’s episode, we reflect on the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021 report. Gordon Lynch, the chair of the TRS panel, joins David Robertson to outline the process and tell us what it says about the situation for the discipline, and the social sciences and Arts and Humanities more broadly.

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Presentism and Politics | Discourse! August 2022 (with video)

Our first #RSPdiscourse episode for the season features host Emily D. Crews, who is joined by long-time friends of the RSP, Richard Newton and Theo Wildcroft. This excellent and wide-ranging episode addresses present issues of history and identity, social activism and new religious movements, doulas and abortion rights, and much, much more! You won’t want to miss it. Be sure to tune in and check out the video episode!

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Our Latest Response

To My Comrade in Deconstructive Critique

Mitsutoshi Horii, in his response to our season 11 episode with Jason Ā. Josephson Storm, furthers Storm's discussion of the importance of problematizing our systems of classification and highlights the critical scholarship in religious studies doing some of this work.

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Earlier Responses

Nothing Is Perfect, but Is Anything New?

K. Merinda Simmons nuances and furthers Jason Josephson Storm’s episode from Season 11 by reflecting critically on the ways in which postmodernism is explicitly—or even implicitly—dismissed in religious studies scholarship.

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Textbook in Today’s University

Responding to our interview with Paul Hedges, Steven Ramey builds on the discussion by arguing for the necessity of unpacking the authority associated with textbooks and shifting pedagogical approaches from presenting information to training students to think critically about the information presented.

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