About this episode

Religious studies scholars (and policy experts) Susan Hayward and Peter Mandaville join the Religious Studies Project for Discourse in December 2019. They discuss how classifying conflicts as religious or not can clarify–or obscure–the complexities of those conflicts. The conversation includes examples from the United Arab Emirates, Iran, Saudi Arabia, China, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and the United States.

News stories referenced include:

https://m.khaleejtimes.com/uae/abu-dhabi/tolerance-is-the-only-way-to-peace-say-world-leaders-

https://www.tehrantimes.com/news/442726/Tehran-raps-U-S-interference-in-China-s-affairs

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-myanmar-rohingya-world-court-quotebox/demonstrations-mark-case-against-myanmar-at-u-n-s-world-court-idUSKBN1YE1TD

http://www.ft.lk/front-page/BBS-to-disband-after-General-Elections/44-689999

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/10/us/politics/trump-antisemitism-executive-order.html

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