This special edition of #Discourse was recorded at the University of Helsinki in mid-February, with Chris and Study of Religion students Joel Ritala, Jarno Sandberg, Anton Stranden and Martta Tenhu. Topics covered include conspiracy theories, the entanglement of 'religion' in education and festive celebrations in Finland and the UK, the first amendment of the United States constitution, and a controversial conversion in the Netherlands.

About this episode

This special edition of #Discourse was recorded at the University of Helsinki in mid-February, with Chris and Study of Religion students Joel Ritala, Jarno Sandberg, Anton Stranden, and Martta Tenhu. Topics covered include conspiracy theories, the entanglement of ‘religion’ in education and festive celebrations in Finland and the UK, the first amendment of the United States constitution, and a controversial conversion in the Netherlands. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6669799/Far-right-Dutch-MP-branded-Islam-disease-announces-Muslim.html https://religion.ua.edu/blog/2019/02/10/this-week-in-the-first-amendment/ https://yle.fi/uutiset/3-10563613 https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jan/23/conspiracy-theories-internet-survivors-truth https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/jan/20/ultra-orthodox-haredi-jews-resist-new-sex-education-guidance 

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