Chris Cotter is joined by Susannah Crockford and Sierra Lawson in this month's edition of discourse, discussing college football politics in Alabama, Donald Trump's new 'spiritual adviser', a Day of the Dead/Dia de Muertos memorializing migrants who have died at the US border, Armistice/Remembrance/Veterans day rituals, and the recent controversy surrounding QR codes at the AAR-SBL.

About this episode

Chris Cotter is joined by Susannah Crockford and Sierra Lawson in this month’s edition of discourse, discussing college football politics in Alabama, Donald Trump’s new ‘spiritual adviser’, a Day of the Dead/Dia de Muertos memorializing migrants who have died at the US border, Armistice/Remembrance/Veterans’ day rituals, and the recent controversy surrounding QR codes at the AAR-SBL.

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