Responses

Scholars in dialogue with our weekly podcast

Scholars in Dialogue with our weekly podcast

Our Latest response

Using Archaeology to Learn about Christian Diversity and Martyr Shrines

Sarah Griffis highlights how Morehouse demonstrates the central issue of studying diverse social groups in antiquity: "how do you get something new out of what’s already there before it? Whatever it is that’s new needs to be intelligible enough to be compelling and persuasive."

Browse past responses

On Tantra, Jain Style

“The story that Dr. Gough is telling about the development of Jain tantra—the Jain adoption of mantra-practice, but rejection of antinomianism—thus seems to me to be a fundamentally noteworthy case-study,” writes Anne Mocko on our interview with Ellen Gough discussing the ‘tantricization’ of Jain ascetic rituals.

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the cover art for Robin Veldman's book.

Is Climate Denial ‘Bad Religion’?

“Climate change demands intellectual adaptation by scholars of all disciplines, religious studies included,” writes Evan Berry in response to our interview with Robin Veldman on evangelical opposition to climate action.

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Following Resistance

How can Islamic Studies help advance the study of religion and visual and material culture, asks Anna Bigelow in this response to our interview with Richard McGregor. One way is through “close attention to the subtleties” of context, method, and discipline that characterize work that intently follows the objects and their “multiple, shifting registers.”

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The Varieties of Environmental Myth-Making

Stories can “exert an agentic force” that makes them powerful tools for environmental action among the nonreligious for whom belief is a weak analytic category argues Lisa H. Sideris in this response to our interview with Tim Stacey.

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Abusing Religion and the Importance of Refocusing Gazes

“One can refuse to be manipulated by sensationalist media priming the public to generate the outrage that will serve white supremacy,” writes Abimbola Adelakun in this response to our interview with Megan Goodwin on the theory of contraceptive nationalism in her book Abusing Religion

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