Join Emily D. Crews, Alison Robertson, and host Theo Wildcroft for a collection of topical stories on how religion mediates how the state treats human bodies in different ways. And Jesusween!

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On this month’s Discourse!, join Emily D. Crews, Alison Robertson, and host Theo Wildcroft for a collection of topical stories on how religion mediates how the state treats human bodies in different ways. They discuss debates over the presence of pastors in executions in Texas, how the secularist French state is reacting to the abuse revelations in the Catholic Church, and the role of religion in legal arguments over the ownership of a site sacred to a Los Angeles Apache community. Oh – and Jesusween!

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