This month's Discourse! - with Chris Cotter, Ray Kim, and Theo Wildcroft - kicks off with a festive twist on our now-traditional focus upon Covid-19 to discuss recent relaxations in restrictions in the UK, halal vaccinations, and much more.

About this episode

This month’s Discourse! – with Chris Cotter, Ray Kim, and Theo Wildcroft – kicks off with a festive twist on our now-traditional focus upon Covid-19. The panelists discuss the recent decision in the UK to relax lockdown over the Christmas period, and how this intersects with the category of ‘religion’. Sticking with Covid-19, the discussion then moves to the production of vaccines and whether these will be considered ‘halal’ in Islamic communities. This leads to some fascinating conversations around bodily autonomy, agency, the interaction between ‘science’ and ‘religion’, and much more.

The discussion then moves to an emotional long-read from The Guardian focusing upon an individual who emerged from a ‘locked-in’ state and was able to tell the tale. Again, bodily autonomy and agency are the order of the day here. And again, so much more.

Finally, a seemingly amusing story about an unlucky holy stone in Ireland once again raises critical issues surrounding power, agency, and classification.

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