Vivian Asimos and Theodora Wildcroft took the opportunity to ask the delegates of BASR 2019 what inspired them about the conference theme, their opinion about major trends in the discipline, and how they were personally feeling about REF 2021.

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The theme of the BASR conference 2019 was “Visualising Cultures: Media, Religion and Technology”. Vivian Asimos and Theodora Wildcroft took the opportunity to ask the delegates a few pertinent questions: what inspired them about the conference theme, their opinion about major trends in the discipline, and how they were personally feeling about REF 2021. Think of this as a ‘state of the discipline’ round up, as we come closer to the end of the year. With thanks to our participants: Suzanne Owen, Dawn Llewellyn, Bettina Schmidt, Jonathan Tuckett, Aled Thomas, Tim Hutchings, David Robertson, Stephen Brooks and Chris Cotter.

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