March 16, 2015

Is Britain still a Christian country?

When scholars involved in the social scientific study of ‘religion’ encounter claims concerning ‘religious identity’ – of states, groups or individuals – a number of questions immediately spring to mind. UK Prime Minster David Cameron’s controversy-inducing statement around Easter 2014 that Britain is ‘a Christian country’ is a perfect example of how an apparently simple statement is actually highly ambiguous and can potentially mask a host of powerful ideological concerns.

What does Cameron’s statement actually mean? In what sense can a country be “Christian”? Today on the Religious Studies Project, we welcome back Professor Linda Woodhead to discuss and interrogate the question “Is Britain Still a Christian Country?”, the topic of her recent Croall Lectures at the University of Edinburgh.

Listeners might also be interested in our previous podcast with Linda, on The Secularization Thesis. You can also download this interview, and subscribe to receive our weekly podcast, on iTunes. If you enjoyed it, please take a moment to rate us. And remember, you can use our Amazon.co.ukAmazon.com, or Amazon.ca links to support us at no additional cost buying academic texts, British cookbooks, cakes, model railways and more.

Discussion


1 reply to “Is Britain still a Christian country?

  1. Ehsan Butt

    Thomas Jeffeson’s statement:

    “Christianity neither is, nor ever was, a part of the common law.”

    and King Offa Kingdom of Mercia (AD 773-96) in England’s Islamic Arabic coins are just top of the iceberg of evidences that show Islamic foundations of European civilization especially England

    Reply

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