Religion and its Publics (Part 1)

This week we've got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University's conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video!

By Suzanne Newcombe

Suzanne Newcombe researches religion within the disciplines of sociology and social history. Much of her time is now focused on Ayuryog (www.ayuryog.org), an ERC-funded project lead by Dagmar Wujastyk. More generally Suzanne has specialized in the study of new and minority religions (particularly those with their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism) and the social history of yoga, Ayurveda and complementary/alternative medicine in Britain. She has a continuing interest in prophecy and has edited a collection on the subject for the Ashgate-Inform series on minority religions and spiritualities with her colleague Sarah Harvey. Additionally, she teaches as an Associate Lecturer for A332: Why is Religion Controversial? for the Open University  in London.

Suzanne Newcombe

Suzanne Newcombe researches religion within the disciplines of sociology and social history. Much of her time is now focused on Ayuryog (www.ayuryog.org), an ERC-funded project lead by Dagmar Wujastyk. More generally Suzanne has specialized in the study of new and minority religions (particularly those with their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism) and the social history of yoga, Ayurveda and complementary/alternative medicine in Britain. She has a continuing interest in prophecy and has edited a collection on the subject for the Ashgate-Inform series on minority religions and spiritualities with her colleague Sarah Harvey. Additionally, she teaches as an Associate Lecturer for A332: Why is Religion Controversial? for the Open University  in London.

By David G. Robertson

David G. Robertson is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University, co-founder of the Religious Studies Project, and co-editor of the journal Implicit Religion. His work applies critical theory to the study of alternative and emerging religions, and to "conspiracy theory" narratives. He is the author of UFOs, the New Age and Conspiracy Theories: Millennial Conspiracism (Bloomsbury, 2016) and Gnosticism and the History of Religions (Bloomsbury, 2021) and he is co-editor of After World Religions: Reconstructing Religious Studies (Equinox, 2016) and the Handbook of Conspiracy Theories and Contemporary Religion (Brill, 2018).

@d_g_robertson | Academia | blog

David G. Robertson

David G. Robertson is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University, co-founder of the Religious Studies Project, and co-editor of the journal Implicit Religion. His work applies critical theory to the study of alternative and emerging religions, and to "conspiracy theory" narratives. He is the author of UFOs, the New Age and Conspiracy Theories: Millennial Conspiracism (Bloomsbury, 2016) and Gnosticism and the History of Religions (Bloomsbury, 2021) and he is co-editor of After World Religions: Reconstructing Religious Studies (Equinox, 2016) and the Handbook of Conspiracy Theories and Contemporary Religion (Brill, 2018).

@d_g_robertson | Academia | blog

By Alison Robertson

Alison Robertson is a PhD candidate in Religious Studies at the Open University, conducting research into BDSM as lived religious practice.  Prior to beginning her PhD she was a Religious Studies teacher and a Principle Examiner for GCSE and A Level Religious Studies. Her research interests include lived and personal religion, edgework, self-inflicted and/or positive experiences of pain, and blurring the lines people draw between categories such as religious and non-religious or ‘extreme’ religious practice and insanity.

Alison Robertson

Alison Robertson is a PhD candidate in Religious Studies at the Open University, conducting research into BDSM as lived religious practice.  Prior to beginning her PhD she was a Religious Studies teacher and a Principle Examiner for GCSE and A Level Religious Studies. Her research interests include lived and personal religion, edgework, self-inflicted and/or positive experiences of pain, and blurring the lines people draw between categories such as religious and non-religious or ‘extreme’ religious practice and insanity.

By Theo Wildcroft

Theo Wildcroft, PhD is a yoga teacher, trainer, writer and scholar, whose innovative research considers the democratization of yoga post-lineage, and the evolving practice of teaching yoga for community health. She is the author of Post-lineage Yoga: from guru to #metoo, an Associate Lecturer at the Open University, and Project Co-ordinator for the SOAS Centre of Yoga Studies.

Theo Wildcroft

Theo Wildcroft, PhD is a yoga teacher, trainer, writer and scholar, whose innovative research considers the democratization of yoga post-lineage, and the evolving practice of teaching yoga for community health. She is the author of Post-lineage Yoga: from guru to #metoo, an Associate Lecturer at the Open University, and Project Co-ordinator for the SOAS Centre of Yoga Studies.

By Paul-François Tremlett

Paul-François Tremlett joined the Religious Studies department at the Open University in 2010 and is now a Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies. He earned his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London). For his doctorate, Tremlett conducted ethnographic research in the Philippines around the extinct volcano Mount Banahaw, a place popularly associated with healing, magic, and "Rizalism". He is interested in theory and method in Religious Studies, and, as well as ethnographic research in the Philippines, he has conducted research in Hong Kong and London on the Occupy movement. Tremlett is currently using online qualitative methods to explore transnational activism in relation to Filipino human rights organisations. Tremlett's teaching is interdisciplinary, drawing in particular from anthropology, history, and sociology. His research and teaching interests are aligned with the Open University's commitment to equality, diversity, and inclusion and to the Religious Studies department's commitment to knowledge exchange with schools and colleges to promote critical religious literacy. Tremlett is on the editorial board of three, international peer-reviewed journals: Culture and ReligionImplicit Religion and Critical Research on Religion and is a member of the British Association of the Study of Religions, SOCREL and the Royal Anthropological Institute. He is also a member of the Campaign for Human Rights in the Philippines (CHRP-UK). 

Paul-François Tremlett

Paul-François Tremlett joined the Religious Studies department at the Open University in 2010 and is now a Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies. He earned his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London). For his doctorate, Tremlett conducted ethnographic research in the Philippines around the extinct volcano Mount Banahaw, a place popularly associated with healing, magic, and "Rizalism". He is interested in theory and method in Religious Studies, and, as well as ethnographic research in the Philippines, he has conducted research in Hong Kong and London on the Occupy movement. Tremlett is currently using online qualitative methods to explore transnational activism in relation to Filipino human rights organisations. Tremlett's teaching is interdisciplinary, drawing in particular from anthropology, history, and sociology. His research and teaching interests are aligned with the Open University's commitment to equality, diversity, and inclusion and to the Religious Studies department's commitment to knowledge exchange with schools and colleges to promote critical religious literacy. Tremlett is on the editorial board of three, international peer-reviewed journals: Culture and ReligionImplicit Religion and Critical Research on Religion and is a member of the British Association of the Study of Religions, SOCREL and the Royal Anthropological Institute. He is also a member of the Campaign for Human Rights in the Philippines (CHRP-UK). 

In response to:

This week we’ve got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video! This time we decided to do something a little different from our previous videos, we took a look at the conference handbook and found some interesting ideas for some (difficult) questions to ask some of the attendees. 

 

Part II to follow soon!

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