Religion and its Publics (Part 1)

This week we've got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University's conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video!

By Suzanne Newcombe

Suzanne Newcombe researches religion within the disciplines of sociology and social history. Much of her time is now focused on Ayuryog (www.ayuryog.org), an ERC-funded project lead by Dagmar Wujastyk. More generally Suzanne has specialized in the study of new and minority religions (particularly those with their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism) and the social history of yoga, Ayurveda and complementary/alternative medicine in Britain. She has a continuing interest in prophecy and has edited a collection on the subject for the Ashgate-Inform series on minority religions and spiritualities with her colleague Sarah Harvey. Additionally, she teaches as an Associate Lecturer for A332: Why is Religion Controversial? for the Open University  in London.

Suzanne Newcombe

Suzanne Newcombe researches religion within the disciplines of sociology and social history. Much of her time is now focused on Ayuryog (www.ayuryog.org), an ERC-funded project lead by Dagmar Wujastyk. More generally Suzanne has specialized in the study of new and minority religions (particularly those with their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism) and the social history of yoga, Ayurveda and complementary/alternative medicine in Britain. She has a continuing interest in prophecy and has edited a collection on the subject for the Ashgate-Inform series on minority religions and spiritualities with her colleague Sarah Harvey. Additionally, she teaches as an Associate Lecturer for A332: Why is Religion Controversial? for the Open University  in London.

By David G. Robertson

David G. Robertson is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University, co-founder of the Religious Studies Project, and co-editor of the journal Implicit Religion. His work applies critical theory to the study of alternative and emerging religions, and to "conspiracy theory" narratives. He is the author of UFOs, the New Age and Conspiracy Theories: Millennial Conspiracism (Bloomsbury 2016) and co-editor of After World Religions: Reconstructing Religious Studies (Equinox 2016) and the Handbook of Conspiracy Theories and Contemporary Religion (Brill 2018). Twitter @d_g_robertson | Academia | blog.

David G. Robertson

David G. Robertson is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University, co-founder of the Religious Studies Project, and co-editor of the journal Implicit Religion. His work applies critical theory to the study of alternative and emerging religions, and to "conspiracy theory" narratives. He is the author of UFOs, the New Age and Conspiracy Theories: Millennial Conspiracism (Bloomsbury 2016) and co-editor of After World Religions: Reconstructing Religious Studies (Equinox 2016) and the Handbook of Conspiracy Theories and Contemporary Religion (Brill 2018).

Twitter @d_g_robertson | Academia | blog.

By Alison Robertson

Alison Robertson is a PhD candidate in Religious Studies at the Open University, conducting research into BDSM as lived religious practice.  Prior to beginning her PhD she was a Religious Studies teacher and a Principle Examiner for GCSE and A Level Religious Studies. Her research interests include lived and personal religion, edgework, self-inflicted and/or positive experiences of pain, and blurring the lines people draw between categories such as religious and non-religious or ‘extreme’ religious practice and insanity.

Alison Robertson

Alison Robertson is a PhD candidate in Religious Studies at the Open University, conducting research into BDSM as lived religious practice.  Prior to beginning her PhD she was a Religious Studies teacher and a Principle Examiner for GCSE and A Level Religious Studies. Her research interests include lived and personal religion, edgework, self-inflicted and/or positive experiences of pain, and blurring the lines people draw between categories such as religious and non-religious or ‘extreme’ religious practice and insanity.

By Theo Wildcroft

Theo Wildcroft is a PhD researcher with the Open University, UK. She investigates the democratization and evolution of physical practice as it moves beyond yoga lineages. She co-authored an upcoming article on non-institutional religious practice and pain in the new journal, Bodies and Religion, and authored 'Context. Consent. Contact. An Animist Approach to Consent'. A yoga teacher herself with a decade of experience, Theo’s work has been featured in a number of transnational yoga spaces online, including articles for GatherYoga and J Brown’s yoga podcast.

Theo Wildcroft

Theo Wildcroft is a PhD researcher with the Open University, UK. She investigates the democratization and evolution of physical practice as it moves beyond yoga lineages. She co-authored an upcoming article on non-institutional religious practice and pain in the new journal, Bodies and Religion, and authored 'Context. Consent. Contact. An Animist Approach to Consent'. A yoga teacher herself with a decade of experience, Theo’s work has been featured in a number of transnational yoga spaces online, including articles for GatherYoga and J Brown’s yoga podcast.

By Paul-François Tremlett

Paul-François Tremlett is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University. His PhD research focused on local religion and national identity in the Philippines at  the extinct volcano Mount Banahaw. His present research is more theoretically oriented, including spatialities and geographies and place-making practices; modernity(ies) and secularism(s); Marxism and classical and contemporary social theory.

Paul-François Tremlett

Paul-François Tremlett is Lecturer in Religious Studies at the Open University. His PhD research focused on local religion and national identity in the Philippines at  the extinct volcano Mount Banahaw. His present research is more theoretically oriented, including spatialities and geographies and place-making practices; modernity(ies) and secularism(s); Marxism and classical and contemporary social theory.

In response to:

This week we’ve got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video! This time we decided to do something a little different from our previous videos, we took a look at the conference handbook and found some interesting ideas for some (difficult) questions to ask some of the attendees. 

 

Part II to follow soon!

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