Suzanne Newcombe

Suzanne Newcombe researches religion within the disciplines of sociology and social history. Much of her time is now focused on Ayuryog (www.ayuryog.org), an ERC-funded project lead by Dagmar Wujastyk. More generally Suzanne has specialized in the study of new and minority religions (particularly those with their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism) and the social history of yoga, Ayurveda and complementary/alternative medicine in Britain. She has a continuing interest in prophecy and has edited a collection on the subject for the Ashgate-Inform series on minority religions and spiritualities with her colleague Sarah Harvey. Additionally, she teaches as an Associate Lecturer for A332: Why is Religion Controversial? for the Open University  in London.

Contributions by Suzanne Newcombe

podcast

ISKCON And When New Religions Aren't So New Anymore

A roundtable discussion considering the future of ISKCON and what happens when religions are no longer 'new'. As a follow-up to our interview with Kim Knott on ISKCON in Britain, this podcast is a roundtable discussion at the ISKCON 50 conference at Bath Spa University, 2016.

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response

Religion and its Publics (Part 1)

This week we've got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University's conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video!

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response

Religion and its Publics (Part 2)

In the last feature of the "semester" we're continuing with the video format. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University's conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. I went about asking the pundits a couple of questions about Religion and its Publics. This week we have the second question (link for Part 1 in the sidebar).

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podcast

Discourse! #9 | July 2019

This month on Discourse!, David Robertson, Suzanne Newcombe and Daniel Gorman, Jr. discuss some recent figures on religious change, and why the term 'cult' is making a comeback in the US

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