Editors’ Picks, Summer 2018: Disenchanting India

This week, Ella Bock tells us why she thinks you should re-listen to our interview with Johannes Quack on Indian Rationalism, and a Relational Approach to Non-religion: "A great listen for better understanding the boundary between religion and non-religion, especially outside of a western context!"

Ella Bock
By Ella Bock

Since 2018, Ella has worked to produce the weekly Religious Studies Opportunities Digest. She holds a BA in International Affairs with a minor in Political Economy from Lewis & Clark College. In August 2020, Ella began as VISTA Volunteer Coordinator at Legal Aid Chicago. In her free time, Ella enjoys trying out new recipes, gardening, biking, and all kinds of arts and crafts projects!

Ella Bock

Ella Bock

Since 2018, Ella has worked to produce the weekly Religious Studies Opportunities Digest. She holds a BA in International Affairs with a minor in Political Economy from Lewis & Clark College. In August 2020, Ella began as VISTA Volunteer Coordinator at Legal Aid Chicago. In her free time, Ella enjoys trying out new recipes, gardening, biking, and all kinds of arts and crafts projects!

In response to:

Indian Rationalism, and a Relational Approach to Nonreligion

It is unfortunate fact that in popular ‘Western’ imagination, the land of India is frequently orientalised, and naively conceptualized as ‘the quintessential land of religion, spirituality, and miracles.’ Although we would certainly not want to completely invert this stereotype by substituting one unnuanced and inaccurate construct for another, ...

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During our “summer break”, various members of the RSP editorial team will be sharing their thoughts on some podcasts from the RSP archive that they think you should listen to (again). Editors’ Picks, if you will. These aren’t necessarily ‘favourites’, but just some podcasts that came to mind that the author has found useful for whatever reason. We hope you enjoy these musings, and that you’ll maybe share some of your own in the comments, on social media, or by sending us an audio or video clip. And we’ll be back with new content on 17 September! Thanks for listening.

Finishing the ‘series’ is our opportunities digest editor, Ella Bock.

I’m going with Chris Cotter’s interview with Johannes Quack on Indian Rationalism, and a Relational Approach to Non-religion. I chose this podcast because it resonated with many of the themes and ideas I was taught while studying in India last fall. As the podcast addressed, India is often stereotyped and orientalised as an extremely religious, spiritual, and mystic place. And although there are many religions, traditions, and beliefs in India, there is also a long history of non-religion and secularism. This podcast follows Quack’s work studying rationalist movements in India while attempting to define non-religion and understanding what it means in an Indian context. A great listen for better understanding the boundary between religion and non-religion, especially outside of a western context!

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You can listen to the podcast below, view and download from the original post, or find it on iTunes and other podcast providers.
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