A World-Conscious Sociology of Religion?

This week we're doing something a little bit different. Instead of a written response to the podcast we have a video response instead: For my take on James Spickard’s phenomenology see: “Prolegomena to a Philosophical Phenomenology of Religion: a critique of sociological phenomenology”.

By Jonathan Tuckett

Dr Jonathan Tuckett is now an independent researcher, having just finished teaching fellowships with the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh. He is a specialist in Theory and Method, and philosophical phenomenology. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Stirling in 2015 with a thesis critiquing our idea of "social science" in the study of religion. His current research is on Levels of Intersubjectivity, looking at the different ways in which we engage and constitute the "Other".

Jonathan Tuckett

Dr Jonathan Tuckett is now an independent researcher, having just finished teaching fellowships with the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh. He is a specialist in Theory and Method, and philosophical phenomenology. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Stirling in 2015 with a thesis critiquing our idea of "social science" in the study of religion. His current research is on Levels of Intersubjectivity, looking at the different ways in which we engage and constitute the "Other".

In response to:

Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through Non-Western Eyes

In this interview, recorded at the SocRel 2017 Annual Conference, Professor James Spickard talks about his latest project. Starting with a critique of North American sociology’s approach to religion, Spickard emphasises how our concepts of religion are historically grounded,

A Response to James Spickard on “Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through Non-Western Eyes”

by Jonathan Tuckett

This week we’re doing something a little bit different. Instead of a written response to the podcast we have a video response instead:

For my take on James Spickard’s phenomenology see: “Prolegomena to a Philosophical Phenomenology of Religion: a critique of sociological phenomenology”. Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (forthcoming).

And of course, do check out his new book: Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through non-Western Eyes (2017).

If you’re interested in the topic of public sociology you can find Burawoy’s announcement of “public sociology” at the American Sociological Association conference, along with various responses, in special editions of The American Sociological Review 70, Soziale Welte 56 and The British Journal of Sociology 56 (all 2005).

This is all proof of format. So ignore the fact that I very quickly forget to look directly at the camera and the editing is a little bit choppy! If you enjoyed this – or think it’s a horrible idea – we want to hear from you, tell us what you think in the comments below!

 

 

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