A World-Conscious Sociology of Religion?

This week we're doing something a little bit different. Instead of a written response to the podcast we have a video response instead: For my take on James Spickard’s phenomenology see: “Prolegomena to a Philosophical Phenomenology of Religion: a critique of sociological phenomenology”.

By Jonathan Tuckett

Dr Jonathan Tuckett is now an independent researcher, having just finished teaching fellowships with the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh. He is a specialist in Theory and Method, and philosophical phenomenology. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Stirling in 2015 with a thesis critiquing our idea of "social science" in the study of religion. His current research is on Levels of Intersubjectivity, looking at the different ways in which we engage and constitute the "Other".

Jonathan Tuckett

Dr Jonathan Tuckett is now an independent researcher, having just finished teaching fellowships with the Universities of Stirling and Edinburgh. He is a specialist in Theory and Method, and philosophical phenomenology. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Stirling in 2015 with a thesis critiquing our idea of "social science" in the study of religion. His current research is on Levels of Intersubjectivity, looking at the different ways in which we engage and constitute the "Other".

In response to:

Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through Non-Western Eyes

In this interview, recorded at the SocRel 2017 Annual Conference, Professor James Spickard talks about his latest project. Starting with a critique of North American sociology’s approach to religion, Spickard emphasises how our concepts of religion are historically grounded,

A Response to James Spickard on “Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through Non-Western Eyes”

by Jonathan Tuckett

This week we’re doing something a little bit different. Instead of a written response to the podcast we have a video response instead:

For my take on James Spickard’s phenomenology see: “Prolegomena to a Philosophical Phenomenology of Religion: a critique of sociological phenomenology”. Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (forthcoming).

And of course, do check out his new book: Alternative Sociologies of Religion: Through non-Western Eyes (2017).

If you’re interested in the topic of public sociology you can find Burawoy’s announcement of “public sociology” at the American Sociological Association conference, along with various responses, in special editions of The American Sociological Review 70, Soziale Welte 56 and The British Journal of Sociology 56 (all 2005).

This is all proof of format. So ignore the fact that I very quickly forget to look directly at the camera and the editing is a little bit choppy! If you enjoyed this – or think it’s a horrible idea – we want to hear from you, tell us what you think in the comments below!

 

 

Other EPISODES YOU MIGHT ENJOY

Stereotyping Religion: Critical Approaches to Pervasive Cliches

Podcast

"Religions are belief systems", "Religions are intrinsically violent", "Religion is Bullshit"... these are just some of the pervasive cliches that we might hear from time to time in the English-speaking world about our central topic of discussion on the RSP, 'religion'.
Titus Hjelm on Marxist Approaches to the Study of Religions

Podcast

"The foundation of irreligious criticism is: Man makes religion, religion does not make man. Religion is indeed the self-consciousness and self-esteem of man who has either not yet won through to himself or has already lost himself again. But man is no abstract being squatting outside the world. Man is the world of man, state, society. This state and this society produce religion, ...
The “Axial Age”: Problematising Religious History in a Post-Colonial Setting

Podcast

In the latest #RSPpod from our friends in Australia, Dr Jack Tsonis gets fired up about the "Axial Age" as well as the difficulties the immediate post-PhD years. Karl Jaspers created the term “Axial Age” in 1949 after considering that the Bhagavad Gita, the Pali Canon, the Book of Isaiah,...
The Changing Nature of Religion

Podcast

In the 1960s, most sociologists consciously or unconsciously bought into idea of the 'death of god' - religion became effectively invisible to academia. Throughout the 1980s and 90s, a number of events - most notably the 'Satanic Verses' controversy - dramatically increased the 'visibility' of religion: it became a political problem. Now, in the 21st century, ...
Global Categories; Local Contexts

Podcast

Carlo Ginzburg is professor emeritus in History of European Cultures in Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy. A distinguished historian with a remarkable career, Ginzburg is known for his microhistorical research approach. His most well-known book The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth Century Miller follows clues ...
Sex Scandals and Minoritized Religions

Podcast

What do Muslims, Mormons, and Satanists have in common? Megan Goodwin argues that for all three groups, sex scandals were used to paint religious groups as un-American and "bad" religion. Learn more about minoritization and its role in policing American identity in this week's episode.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial- NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

The views expressed in podcasts, features and responses are the views of the individual contributors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Religious Studies Project or our sponsors. The Religious Studies Project is produced by the Religious Studies Project Association (SCIO), a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (charity number SC047750).