A very special episode of the podcast this week, to mark the beginning of our annual summer hiatus. For the past year, I (David) have kept a file where all the little amusing bits that didn't make it into the weekly episodes got put. Sometimes, this was because of restraints of time, but more often they were simply too 'scandalous'. I broadcast them here with that proviso.

About this episode

A very special episode of the podcast this week, to mark the beginning of our annual summer hiatus.
Photo: Podcast Fuel
This week is brought to you by Gordon’s Gin & Tonic (other gins are available)
For the past year, I (David) have kept a file where all the little amusing bits that didn’t make it into the weekly episodes got put. Sometimes, this was because of restraints of time, but more often they were simply too ‘scandalous’. I broadcast them here with that proviso. (I should also mention that they became far fewer when the others began to realise what I was up to…) But before that, Chris, Louise and I got together to look back at the past year for the RSP. What have we learned? What worked and what didn’t? And we look to the future, and next year’s plans. We’d love to hear from you, the listeners, about you liked this year, and what you’d like to see more of. Or less of. Episodes like this, for example. We’ll be back in September. Thanks for listening. You can also download this podcast, and subscribe to receive it weekly, on iTunes. And if you enjoyed it, please take a moment to rate us, or use our Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com link to support us when buying your important books etc. Just to give you an idea of what the academic year 2012/13 meant for the RSP, here is a list of all the podcasts we released. Summer listening, perhaps? You’ll find a lot more – including roundtable discussions and our weekly features essays in our archive.

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