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David Robertson talks to Naomi Goldenberg in this episode of Are You My Data? recorded at Leibniz University in Hannover.

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David Robertson talks to Naomi Goldenberg in this episode of Are You My Data?, recorded at Leibniz University in Hannover. Topics include Naomi’s teaching strategies, some really useful time management and writing strategies, before the second half of the conversation moves to the critical study of religion. Why hasn’t the critical study of religion fundamentally changes the field in the twenty years since The Ideology of Religious Studies? How do we move the agenda on past the stage of simply deconstructing the category, and get the idea out beyond scholarly discourse?

[audio src="https://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/AYMD-goldenberg.mp3" /]

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