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About this episode

Welcome to a brand new Patron-only series here at the RSP – Are You My Data? We asked our patrons what they would ask Russell McCutcheon of the University of Alabama, if they could ask him anything. This is the result! Questions include: Are you still critical of the Cognitive Science of Religion? A post-Eliade History of Religions: are we there yet? Given how knowledge is reproduced in elite doctoral programs in the US, what chance for critical/poststructural approaches taking hold there? …and the origin of Are You My Data? Who should we approach next? Let us know in the comments!

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