About this episode

Welcome to a brand new Patron-only series here at the RSP – Are You My Data? We asked our patrons what they would ask Carole Cusack of the University of Sydney, if they could ask her anything. This is the result! Questions include: what does an hour in your classroom look like? How many academic children do you have? Any advice for Early Career scholars? How do you manage to produce so much? And much more. Coming soon: Russell McCutcheon. We’re closed for questions this time, but watch out for the next call…

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