Ashlee Quosigk

Ashlee Quosigk is a Ph.D. student at Queen’s University Belfast. She received her B.A in History from Kennesaw State University before moving to San Antonio where she completed her M.A. degree in World History from the University of Texas SA. After graduating from UTSA, she enjoyed teaching Honors History for them, employing an innovative service-learning component in each of her classes. Her dissertation analyzes Christian-Muslim relations with a view to understanding inter- and intra-religious conflicts and their potential for transformation. It specifically examines how Evangelical Christians in the United States are dialoguing about Islam, focusing on Evangelical Christians within the urban Southern US. Her work expands on the limited work on Evangelical Christianity and Islam, demonstrating that Evangelicals are complex in their theological, moral, and political attitudes about Islam and illustrating that Evangelicals advocate varying degrees and forms of interaction with Islam. Email: ashlee.quosigk@gmail.com

Contributions by Ashlee Quosigk

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Conference report: Rethinking Boundaries in the Study of Religion and Politics

"Oganessian proposed that if we were to view politics, or the public sphere, as a “marketplace of ideas,” that would allow us to move beyond the religious/secular binary that dominates western thought. In this “marketplace of ideas” framework, we should view all ideologies, concepts, or moralities as having a societal value, and politics as a kind of flea market for any given worldview to sell their perspective on how to govern the society. This framework frees religious thought of its unfair stereotype of only being suited for one’s private life, putting it on an even footing with all other worldviews."

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Conference report: “Religious Pluralisation—A Challenge for Modern Societies”

A conference report for The Religious Studies Project by Ashlee Quosigk, a PhD student at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland on the “Religious Pluralisation—A Challenge for Modern Societies” Conference, which had an important and timely mission to identify innovative research approaches as well as broad political and social scopes of action to address religious plurality.

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