Posts

Religious Studies Project Opportunities Digest – 13 September 2016

Do you have a call for papers, an event announcement, a job vacancy, grant or award you would like others to distribute?

How about having your notification posted with the Religious Studies Project’s weekly Opportunities Digest? It’s easy, just forward them to oppsdigest@gmail.com! Please be aware that the old e-mail addressoppsdigest@religiousstudiesproject.com does not currently work.

You can find previous Opportunities Digests here: https://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/categ…/opportunities/

Calls for papers

Book series: Bloomsbury Studies in Material Religion

Deadline: N/A

More information

Conference: Congregational Music: Local and Global Perspectives

July 18–21, 2017

Ripon College Cuddesdon, Oxford, UK

Deadline: December 15, 2016

More information

Conference: Frontiers: Cosmos, Curiosity, Creativity

November 12–13, 2016

McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Deadline: September 15, 2016

More information

Conference: CESNUR: Holy Lands and Sacred Histories in New Religious Movements

July 2–7, 2017

Van Leer Jerusalem Institute, Israel

Deadline: January 2, 2017

More information

Conference: Mysticism in Comparative Perspective

December 14–16, 2016

Glasgow University, UK

Deadline: September 15, 2016

More information

Journal: Religion & Law Review

Deadline: November 1, 2016

More information

Meta-analysis: Can religiosity be manipulated in the lab?

Morality and Beliefs Lab, University of London, UK

More information

Panel: Recovering the Social: Personal troubles and public issues

BSA Annual Conference

April 4–6, 2017

Deadline: October 14, 2016

More information

Events

Conference: Holding Palestine in the Light: The context of conflict

October 7–9, 2016

Lichfield Cathedral, UK

More information

Conference: Towards Digital Folkloristics: Research perspectives, archival praxis, ethical challenges

September 14–16, 2016

Riga, Latvia

More information

Jobs

Editors and Peer Reviewers

Religion & Law Review

Deadline: October 2, 2016

More information

Psychological Approaches to the Study of Religion

In practice, experimentation requires much effort, imagination, and resources. The subject of religion seems too complex and too ‘soft’ for the laboratory. It is filled with much fantasy and feelings, two topics which academic psychology finds hard to approach.

Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin, and Michael Argyle. The Psychology of Religious Behaviour, Belief and Experience. London: Routledge, 1997, p. 47.

Psychology of religion involves the application of psychological methods and interpretive frameworks to religious institutions, as well as to individuals of all religious or noreligious persuasions. Last November, Chris had the pleasure of chatting to Professor Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi about the psychological approach, how one applies it to the study of religion, and the various challenges and advantages contained therein. This interview was recorded in the heart of New York City, and we can only hope that the ambient noise adds to the character of the interview.

You can also download this interview, and subscribe to receive our weekly podcast, on iTunes.

Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi studied clinical psychology in Israel and the U.S. and is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Haifa. He has published extensively in the critical theory of academic psychology with focus on the psychopathology of religion. His books include Despair and Deliverance: Private Salvation in Contemporary Israel (1992), Psychoanalytic Studies of Religion: A Critical Assessment (1996) and The psychology of religious behaviour, belief and experience (1997) with Michael Argyle. He is also author of The Israeli Connection (Pantheon 1987), concerning the Israeli armaments industry, and Original Sins: Reflections on the History of Zionism and Israel (Olive Branch 1993), a counter-mystification of the origins, accomplishments, contradictions, and betrayals of Zionism.

In answer to the question “what can science say about atheism?”, Professor Beit-Hallahmi published the article “Cognitive Approaches to the Study of Religion, and Erica Salomon’s response essay.

Podcasts

Religious Studies Project Opportunities Digest – 13 September 2016

Do you have a call for papers, an event announcement, a job vacancy, grant or award you would like others to distribute?

How about having your notification posted with the Religious Studies Project’s weekly Opportunities Digest? It’s easy, just forward them to oppsdigest@gmail.com! Please be aware that the old e-mail addressoppsdigest@religiousstudiesproject.com does not currently work.

You can find previous Opportunities Digests here: https://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/categ…/opportunities/

Calls for papers

Book series: Bloomsbury Studies in Material Religion

Deadline: N/A

More information

Conference: Congregational Music: Local and Global Perspectives

July 18–21, 2017

Ripon College Cuddesdon, Oxford, UK

Deadline: December 15, 2016

More information

Conference: Frontiers: Cosmos, Curiosity, Creativity

November 12–13, 2016

McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Deadline: September 15, 2016

More information

Conference: CESNUR: Holy Lands and Sacred Histories in New Religious Movements

July 2–7, 2017

Van Leer Jerusalem Institute, Israel

Deadline: January 2, 2017

More information

Conference: Mysticism in Comparative Perspective

December 14–16, 2016

Glasgow University, UK

Deadline: September 15, 2016

More information

Journal: Religion & Law Review

Deadline: November 1, 2016

More information

Meta-analysis: Can religiosity be manipulated in the lab?

Morality and Beliefs Lab, University of London, UK

More information

Panel: Recovering the Social: Personal troubles and public issues

BSA Annual Conference

April 4–6, 2017

Deadline: October 14, 2016

More information

Events

Conference: Holding Palestine in the Light: The context of conflict

October 7–9, 2016

Lichfield Cathedral, UK

More information

Conference: Towards Digital Folkloristics: Research perspectives, archival praxis, ethical challenges

September 14–16, 2016

Riga, Latvia

More information

Jobs

Editors and Peer Reviewers

Religion & Law Review

Deadline: October 2, 2016

More information

Psychological Approaches to the Study of Religion

In practice, experimentation requires much effort, imagination, and resources. The subject of religion seems too complex and too ‘soft’ for the laboratory. It is filled with much fantasy and feelings, two topics which academic psychology finds hard to approach.

Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin, and Michael Argyle. The Psychology of Religious Behaviour, Belief and Experience. London: Routledge, 1997, p. 47.

Psychology of religion involves the application of psychological methods and interpretive frameworks to religious institutions, as well as to individuals of all religious or noreligious persuasions. Last November, Chris had the pleasure of chatting to Professor Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi about the psychological approach, how one applies it to the study of religion, and the various challenges and advantages contained therein. This interview was recorded in the heart of New York City, and we can only hope that the ambient noise adds to the character of the interview.

You can also download this interview, and subscribe to receive our weekly podcast, on iTunes.

Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi studied clinical psychology in Israel and the U.S. and is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Haifa. He has published extensively in the critical theory of academic psychology with focus on the psychopathology of religion. His books include Despair and Deliverance: Private Salvation in Contemporary Israel (1992), Psychoanalytic Studies of Religion: A Critical Assessment (1996) and The psychology of religious behaviour, belief and experience (1997) with Michael Argyle. He is also author of The Israeli Connection (Pantheon 1987), concerning the Israeli armaments industry, and Original Sins: Reflections on the History of Zionism and Israel (Olive Branch 1993), a counter-mystification of the origins, accomplishments, contradictions, and betrayals of Zionism.

In answer to the question “what can science say about atheism?”, Professor Beit-Hallahmi published the article “Cognitive Approaches to the Study of Religion, and Erica Salomon’s response essay.