Monika Salzbrunn

Monika Salzbrunn is a professor in "Religions, Migrations, Diasporas" at Lausanne University, Switzerland. She is also the director at the Research Institute for Social Sciences of Contemporary Religions (IRSSCR). The institute is one of the biggest research institutes in Europe for sociology of religion, and it has three areas of specialty. These are psychology of religion, migration and diaspora and sociology of religion. In addition, there is the ORS, the Observatory of Religions in Switzerland.

Monika Salzbrunn is one of the three full-time professors working at the institute, and she has been involved in as well as in charge of a multitude of research projects, addressing both transnational issues as well as the Swiss religious landscape. Her focus areas include e.g. transnational public spaces, religious events, festivities and carneval. Geographically, her interest areas are Europe, Western Africa and the United States. She is co-chair of the migration section of the French Association of Sociology and the urban studies section at the International Association of French-Speaking Sociologists.

Monika Salzbrunn's latest publications include:

- Reuschke, Darka, Salzbrunn, Monika, Schönhärl, Korinna (eds), 2013: The Economies of Urban Diversity. Palgrave

- Salzbrunn, Monika & Sekine, Yasumasa: From Community to Commonality. Multiple Belonging and Street Phenomena in the Era of Reflexive Modernization, 2011 Tokyo: Seijo University Press.

Contributions by Monika Salzbrunn

podcast

Religion, Migration and Diaspora

“We had so many studies focusing on institutions and on official discourse, and so few studies on the silent majority, which never shows up in these institutions... So we over-emphasize the religious belongings. All the muslims are supposed to know the Quran, although they don't. Some of them have never opened it.

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