Jacqueline Hargreaves

Jacqueline Hargreaves researches the contemporary meeting place between historical practices and their application in a modern (mainly therapeutic) environment. She has a special interest in Indian Yoga traditions and Japanese Zen. Jacqueline holds a Bachelor of Engineering (with Honours) from the University of NSW and has worked internationally as a consultant in Australia, Canada, USA, Japan, China, Korea and India. She has spent the last two decades studying and teaching yoga and mindfulness-based meditation practices specifically to assist those with chronic health issues, stress, anxiety and depression.

She is a founding member of the Journal of Yoga Studies, a peer reviewed, open access academic journal, and creator of The Luminescent, an independent, evidence-based research hub for the history and practice of Yoga and Meditation. In collaboration with the Haṭha Yoga Project (SOAS London University), Jacqueline is currently producing a documentary film, which aims to interpret the physical techniques in a historically significant eighteenth-century Sanskrit text called the Haṭhābhyāsapaddhati. She is also constructing a visual and textual timeline for premodern Ayurveda and Yoga for the AyurYog Project (University of Vienna).

Contributions by Jacqueline Hargreaves

podcast

Discourse #7, April Edition

This month on Discourse, Jaqueline Hargreaves, Jennifer Uzell and Theo Wildcroft approach the news from a Religious Studies perspective. We cover public responses to the Christchurch attack and the wearing of religious symbols as an act of solidarity. We discuss the boundaries of culture and religion, secularism and Buddhism, talking about the translation of mindfulness practices into indigenous Australian languages. Finally, we contemplate the intricate relationships between religious practice and materials, considering a number of recent news stories that involve fire and ash in acts of purification and consecration.

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