Amanda Ryan

Amanda Ryan is a Sociology MA Candidate at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her research interests include religion in public life and politics, human rights, race and religion, and social change. She is currently working on a research project about Latino Jewish identity and code switching. Ms. Ryan works at the Institute for Holocaust Education (IHE) and serves on the Omaha Public Schools Board of Education. For witty takes on politics, religion, cats and the overall complexity of millennial life she can be found on Twitter @amandaleigh2205 and on Facebook.

Contributions by Amanda Ryan

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The Catholic Underground: Lithuanian Catholicism Under the Soviet Union

Instead of expressing a need for pluralism and to be recognized for the differences that their religion brings to the country, religious minorities push for the security of agreeing with the majority.Professor of Sociology at Vytautas Magnus University, in Lithuania has changed during the counter-reformation, the First Republic after WWI, the Soviet Union, and finally after the Second Independence. According to Dr. Alisauskiene, the Roman Catholic Church heavily dominated pre-Soviet Union Lithuania.

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Difference or Diversity: Promoting Dialogue of Diversity as Religious Studies Professionals

Prof. Martin Stringer, now of Swansea University, once again lends his expertise in religious diversity to the Religious Studies Project. In this podcast, Prof. Stringer discusses the changes the discourse of religious diversity. After years of studying in different locations in the U.K. – Birmingham, London, Manchester – Stringer began noticing a pattern in the way people identify.

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Measuring and Categorizing Young Adult Spirituality

It can be argued that previous generations have not been influenced to change and adapt as quickly as Millennials and Generation Z

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Measuring and Categorizing Young Adult Spirituality

Previous generations have not been influenced to change and adapt as quickly as Millennials and Generation Z

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The views expressed in podcasts, features and responses are the views of the individual contributors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Religious Studies Project or our sponsors. The Religious Studies Project is produced by the Religious Studies Project Association (SCIO), a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (charity number SC047750).