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Religious Studies Opportunities Digest (1 June 2012) – Calls for Papers, Jobs, Conferences and more…

1 June 2012 Issue

image of booksWe are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources. If you have any content for future digests, please contact us via the various options on our ‘contact’ page.

In this issue:

  • Advanced Notice – Journals
  • Conference Announcements
  • Jobs
  • Calls for Papers
  • New Course

ADVANCED NOTICE – JOURNALS


Contemporary Buddhism, vol 13, Issue 1, 2012 http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcbh20/13/1


Sociology of Religion, May 2012 http://socrel.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/recent?etoc


Theology and Science,vol 10, Issue 2, 2012 http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rtas20/10/2


The second volume of the annual journal Religion and Society: Advances in Research is now available. The contents are listed below. For information on the journal and how to subscribe go to http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/air-rs/

Volume 2

Contents

Introduction

Simon Coleman and Ramon Sarró: Dialogues and Trajectories

I. PORTRAIT – José Casanova

De-Privatization, the Public Sphere and Popular Religion

Hubert Knoblauch

Public and Private in the Study of Religion: Innovative Approaches

Grace Davie

Casanova, Asad and the Public Debate on Religion in Modern Societies

Kim Knibbe

Toward a Post-Weberian Sociology of Global Religions

Manuel A. Vásquez

From Modernization, to Secularization, to Globalization: An Autobiographical Self-Reflection

José Casanova

II. ARTICLES

Encountering the Supernatural: A Phenomenological Account of Mind

Julia Cassaniti and Tanya Luhrmann

The Case for Religious Transmission: Time and Transmission in the Anthropology of Christianity

Vlad Naumescu

On and Off the Margin: The Anthropology of Contemporary Jewry

Andrew Buckser

Inter-Publics’: Hindu Mobilization Beyond the Bourgeoisie Public Sphere

Ursula Rao

Pentecostalism and ‘National Culture’: A Dialogue Between Brazilian Social Sciences and the Anthropology of Christianity

Cecilia Mariz and Roberta Campos

III. DEBATE SECTION: RELIGION AND VIOLENCE

Religious Violence as Folklore

William T. Cavanaugh

Reflections on ‘Religious Violence’: Reconsidering Durkheim

Wendy James

Religion and Civil War in Africa: Durkheim and Douglas Revisited

Paul Richards

IV. AN AUTHOR MEETS HER CRITICS

Around Ruth Marshall’s Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria

Comments

John Peel, Daniel Smith, Joel Robbins, Jean-François Bayart

Response to Comments

Ruth Marshall

V. TEACHING ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION

The Anthropology of Religious Controversy: A Masters Level Course

Peter Collins and Yulia Egorova

VI. NEWS

VII. BOOKS AND FILMS REVIEWS


CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS


Epigraphical Evidence for the Formation and Rise of Early Śaivism: The Religious Landscape at the Time of the Composition and Spread of the Skandapurāṇa

June 4-5 2012, University of Groningen, the Netherlands

Towards the end of the Gupta-Vākāṭaka period, religious sectarian movements started to feature prominently in the political landscape of early medieval India (ca. 400 – 900 CE). One of the most dominant religious traditions in this period is Śaivism, revolving around the worship of the god Śiva. Its propagators developed strong ties to royal houses and grew to be successful in establishing a range of religious institutions under its authority throughout the Indianized world, as recently laid out in Sanderson’s seminal work ‘The Śaiva Age’ (2009). The theology, mythology and ritual codes of the various branches of Śaivism are recorded in an array of textual material but the most important sources for assessing their historical reality on the ground are contained in the epigraphical corpus. These traces of institutional activities often long predate our extant textual evidence.

The contributors of the symposium will present religious epigraphical data on early forms of Śaivism and its competitors pertaining to its formative period in India, Nepal, Cambodia and Campā. These data will be contextualized and correlated with the political history and findings from the study of the religious textual corpus. Insights generated in this symposium aim to contribute towards a more differentiated understanding of the historical and social reality of these religious traditions themselves, as well as of the religious milieu and socio-political dynamics which facilitated the creation and dissemination of a large body of religious scriptures. One important example of such a scripture is the oldest extant version of the Skandapurāṇa, which is our earliest evidence of a systematization of Śiva mythology and contains the earliest extant origination myths of the Śaiva Pāśupata tradition, the precursor of the various forms of Tantric Śaivism. By linking epigraphical material with such textual evidence and vice versa, we hope to shed more light on the religious developments in this transitional period from the classical to the medieval.

For the programme, please see http://www.rug.nl/ggw/onderzoek/onderzoeksinstituten/indian/ProgrammeSymposium.pdf (PDF).

Symposium Organization: Nina Mirnig (n.mirnig@rug.nl) and Natasja Bosma (n.bosma@rug.nl)


BSA Teaching Group

Inaugural Conference

28th – 30th September 2012

Menzies Strathallan Hotel, Birmingham

Speakers:

  • Professor John Holmwood (University of Nottingham), Former Chair of the Council of UK Heads & Professors of Sociology, Fellow of Academy of Social Sciences & the incoming President of the British Sociological Association
  • Professor Corrine Squire (University of East London), Humanities & Social Sciences, Author of ‘Women & AIDS: Physiological Perspectives’
  • Dr Paul Bagguley (University of Leeds), Researcher in the Sociology of Protest, Author of ‘Riotous Citizens: ethnic conflict in multicultural Britain’

Exam Training Sessions – delegates will be able to attend exam training sessions run by chief examiners from the major exam boards, select from workshop sessions to match specific career development targets and see recent subject specific resources.

Workshops will include sharing Ofsted experiences, Differentiation, Gifted & Talented and ICT in the Classroom.

               Postgraduate Micro-lectures covering areas such as: culture & identity creation; differentiation; inequality & stratisfication; demography; welfare & government policy in most fields of life; family & households; the role of women; minority groups; aging; youth culture; all aspects of education especially potential changes & their effects on different groups within sociology; health & welfare; wealth & poverty & welfare provision; politics & power; globalisation in all its many aspects; religion; crime & deviance; methodology; theory & the role of research.

Conference Registration Cost:

Full Conference (including accommodation & food):

BSA Members £260; BSA Teaching Group Members: £285; Non-members: £350

Saturday Day Delegate (excludes Conference dinner & accommodation)

BSA Members £70; BSA Teaching Group Members: £90; Non-members: £120

Thanks to the generous support from The Higher Education Academy, the BSA Teaching Group committee is able to offer 10 FREE places, to include Conference fees, meals, accommodation and dinner for the successful candidates.    To qualify you must be: a postgraduate student and not have access to institutional or other alternative funding; a PGCE Student and those who have qualified in the last year.

Early bird discount ends 17th August 2012, any bookings received after this date will incur an additional £50 charge.

For further information on how to join the BSA, the Teaching Group and funded places, please go to www.britsoc.co.uk

Please direct any enquiries to: bsatg@britsoc.org.uk Tel: (0191) 383 0839.


JOBS


Postdoctoral and research assistant possibilities in Buddhist / S. Asian Studies

Expressions of interest (not applications) are sought for possible appointments on a year-long cross-disciplinary project starting in October 2012 (contingent on grant decisions). The period of study is the late 19th – early 20th century.

The postdoctoral researcher will ideally have both Hindi-Urdu and Sinhala sufficient for archival research, training or experience in archival work and a background in religious studies or history, but candidates with cognate profiles may be considered. The appointment will be based in Ireland but involve 3 months work in S. Asia.

The research assistant will ideally hold an MA or be pursuing a PhD in social movements or a related field of history, but candidates with cognate profiles may be considered. The appointment will be based in Ireland but involve 2 months work in N. America.

Posts will be formally advertised in due course (subject to funding decisions to be announced in early August) but with a tight deadline. For further information and to be kept informed of advertisements please contact Dr Laurence Cox at laurence.cox@nuim.ie .

Please note that this is not a job advertisement and these positions may not be appointed if funding is not secured: this call for expressions of interest is made because of the tight timeframe if grant applications are successful.


Accepting Applications for the Initial Two Integral Chairs

The Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought (Amman, Jordan – website) invites applications for the following two endowed Chairs:

  1. The King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Waqf for the Integral Chair for the Study of Imam Al-Ghazali’s Work
  2. The King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Waqf for the Integral Chair for the Study of Imam Fakhr Al-Din Al-Razi’s Work

Below you’ll find out more about this monumental project, requirements for application, and links to further information.

The Major Challenge

The sciences of traditional Islamic knowledge are very poorly understood in the Islamic World, and taught only in selective, abbreviated versions. Ignorance has spread in the mosques while secular academic methodologies rule the institutes of learning in the Islamic World. Even in the West, though Muslims have donated hundreds of millions of dollars to create professorial chairs and academic centres in leading western universities, these chairs and centres are invariably run or occupied by non-Muslims (or secular Muslims), and so the centres and chairs – funded by Muslims! – wind up being hostile, or at least unhelpful, to traditional Islam. This situation is leading to intellectual and spiritual impoverishment in the Islamic World, a rise in fundamentalism, and ironically, at the same time, a rise in secularism.

Purpose and Goal

The purpose of this initiative is to restore knowledge and teaching of traditional Islamic orthodox high culture and scholarship in philosophy, theology, mysticism, jurisprudence, Qur’anic exegesis, sociology, history and Arabic language and grammar in the Islamic World in combination with traditional Islamic teaching and preaching methods.

The goal of this initiative is to set up around 50 Integral Chairs in the Islamic World each as a waqf (religious endowment) in mosques and universities combined, occupied by practicing Muslim scholars, and dedicated to the intellectual and spiritual legacy of the greatest Muslim scholars and sages. Thereafter, an international institute to connect and support their activities will be established.

Brochure: Learn more by downloading the brochure about this initiative.

The First Two Chairs

The first two Chairs have been created with complete funding and a waqf established for each. We are now accepting applications for both.

Imam Al-Ghazali Chair

Named After: Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad Al-Ghazali (450–505 AH / 1058–1111 CE)

Primary Book: Ihya Ulum ad-Din

Chair based in: Al-Aqsa Mosque, Jerusalem and Al-Quds University.

Waqf Status: Waqf and complete funding established on 30 January 2012; professor to be appointed.

Summary: The King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Waqf for the Integral Chair for the Study of Imam Al-Ghazali’s Work was established in Jerusalem at the Holy Al-Aqsa Mosque, one of Islam’s three holiest sites, and Al-Quds University. The Chair enjoys full independent administration and is the sole party in charge of selecting students, offering scholarships and awarding the King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Prize for the Study of Imam Al-Ghazali’s Scholarly Legacy.

Brochure: Learn more by downloading the brochure.

Imam Al-Razi Chair

Named After: Fakhr Al-Din Al-Razi (543–606 AH / 1149–1209 CE)

Primary Book: Al-Tafsir Al-Kabir

Chair based in: King Hussein bin Talal State Mosque, Amman, Jordan, and Jordan University and the World Islamic Sciences and Education (W.I.S.E.) University, Amman, Jordan.

Waqf Status: Waqf and complete funding established on 30 January 2012; professor to be appointed.

Summary: The King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Waqf for the Integral Chair for the Study of Imam Fakhr Al-Din Al-Razi’s Work was established at the King Hussein bin Talal Mosque, the University of Jordan and W.I.S.E. University. The Chair enjoys full independent administration and is the sole party in charge of selecting students, offering scholarships and awarding the King Abdullah II ibn Al-Hussein Prize for the Study of Imam Al-Razi’s Scholarly Legacy.

Brochure: Learn more by downloading the brochure.

Requirements

The professor for each chair has to meet the following conditions:

  • That he be Muslim of the Ahl al-Sunnah (Ash’arite, Maturidi) and committed to following one of the four Madhabs (Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi‘i and Hanbali).
  • That he observe prayers and be of fair and reputable character.
  • That he be a hafiz of the Holy Qur’an.
  • That he be specialized and highly qualified in Islamic Sciences with in-depth knowledge of the great scholar that his particular chair focuses on, his work and scholarly legacy.
  • That he be fluent in both Arabic and English; reading, writing, and speaking.
  • That he be a PhD holder and a professor or associate professor at an accredited university or universities.
  • Priority of appointment will be for a local scholar, then those hailing from Palestine, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq.
  • If applicants for the Integral Chairs are found to be of equal qualifications, priority will be given to those who are members of the Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought.
  • The Board may reduce the condition of the professor being a hafiz of the Holy Qur’an to being a hafiz of six parts (ajza’) of the Qur’an.
  • The Board must recommend to the Board of Trustees to dismiss the professor if he breaches a critical condition of the professorship.

Rights and Privileges of the Professor

  • A monthly stipend of 5,000 Jordanian Dinars (approximately $7,000 US).
  • Suitable accommodation and health insurance for the professor and his/her family.
  • Administrative support and secretarial work.
  • If the professor is not a citizen of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, he will be granted diplomatic status.

Applications should be submitted along with a resume, a recent photograph and a copy of the applicant’s passport. Applicants should also include photocopies of cover pages of any published works, including research papers. The names of three references should also be included and sent to the following address no later than 6th June, 2012:

The World Islamic Sciences and Education University

Amman, Jordan.

Learn more about the Chairs and download application forms by visiting the following pages on W.I.S.E. University’s website:

 


University of Bristol, UK – Teaching Fellow in East Asian Religions

<http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44609>


University of Oxford – Departmental Lecturer in Early Islamic History

<http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44597>


Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University – Visiting

Assistant Professor, Middle Eastern History

<http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44630>


CALLS FOR PAPERS


CALL FOR PAPERS: WORKSHOP

Catachreses? ‘Gender’, ‘Religion’, and ‘Postcoloniality’

December 17–19 2012

Hosted by the Centre for Gender and Religions Research School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London

on behalf of the ‘Innovations in the Study of Religion and Gender Project’ funded by The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research

The intimate bonds between colonial scholarship, European colonialism, and the discursive production and employment of ‘religion’ have by now been well charted as have the alternately fruitful and vexed exchanges between feminist, gender-critical, and postcolonial bodies of theory. It is curious, therefore, that there has been so sparse an engagement in the field of Religion and Gender (R&G) concerning the potential intersections between its eponymous objects of study and the constellation of concepts marked as and by ‘postcoloniality’. Even a cursory review of literature in the field in the last decade reveals a startling absence of sustained reflection by R&G scholars on the implications that postcolonial theory might have for their theorizations of gendered practices, identifications, and discourses within religious traditions, or of the ways in which the field itself might require reformulation and revision in light of the compelling epistemological and ontological challenges posed to metropolitan academia by a variety of postcolonialisms. Also worthy of note is the parallel lack of direct attention in postcolonial literature to the assertion of, or resistance to the imposition of ‘religious’ identities in response to colonial valuations of culture, communal identity, and social formations. Under the rubric of ‘postsecularism’, considerations of the overlooked relationship between gender and religion are only now beginning to garner attention, as postcolonial scholars have started to attend more forcefully to the ways that religious affiliation provides rich contexts within which women are able articulate political imaginaries that are consciously resistant to secular-liberalist and feminist frameworks of organising. There is as yet, however, little analysis of the possible formulations of masculinity that are enabled, prevented, or dissimulated via the conjunction of ‘religion’ and ‘postcoloniality’. Furthermore, little attention has been paid to the imperative question as to how ‘postcoloniality’ challenges, criticizes and moves forward discussions initiated by queer theory in relation to religion.

This workshop offers a timely, perhaps overdue, opportunity to (re)visit the question of the necessary triangulation of ‘religion’, ‘gender’ and ‘postcoloniality’ or, put differently, to pose the question of the necessity of thinking these categories together. What imperatives demand their assemblage, what constraints might require their dispersal? To what extent might the field of Religion and Gender need to undergo a process of ‘coming to terms’ such that the theoretical categories that underpin its intellectual itineraries are subjected to renewed critical reflection and reform? With these questions in mind, the workshop proposes a preliminary framework of the ‘catachresis’, defined by Gayatri Spivak as the act of ‘reversing, displacing, and seizing the apparatus of value-coding’ , a definition that extends with political intent the Derridean formulation of catachresis as indicating the original and indeed originary incompleteness that is inherent in all systems of meaning. As Derrida has put it, catachresis ‘concerns first the violent and forced, abusive inscription of a sign, the imposition of a sign upon a meaning which did not yet have its own proper sign in language. So much so that there is no substitution here, no transport of proper signs, but rather the irruptive extension of a sign proper to an idea, a meaning, deprived of their signifier. A “secondary” original”’ (This ‘secondary origin’ produces ‘a new kind of proper sense, by means of a catachresis whose intermediary status tends to escape the opposition of the primitive [sense] and the figurative [sense], standing between them as a “middle”’.  Catachresis, as the ‘middle’, is here also a ‘between’, an interval that is neither purely semantic nor purely syntactic; a spacing in other words. As such, the conceptual richness of catachresis as a thematic focus for the triadic formulation of ‘religion’, ‘gender’ and ‘postcoloniality’ may enable some ground clearing, a space for reflection on the variety of naming and conceptualizing mechanisms, the forging of connections, the imposition of systems of intellectual prescription that have been wielded, challenged and refused with the field of Religion and Gender. It is the catachrestic nature of these three concepts that we seek to probe and push here such that the relationship between categorization and value coding can be disclosed, undone, displaced, and rethought. What do the terms ‘religion’, ‘gender’ and ‘postcoloniality’ disclose about their own and their respective incompleteness? What might the assumption of their intersection or dialogic necessity imply about their inscription in a particular type and time of ‘worlding’? Is the neglect of their intersection by R&G scholars a sign of their incompatibility or possible emptiness as intellectual constructs—indeed, as lived realities—or of a troubling lacuna in the field? What impropriety is promised by the conjunction of these three concepts and which boundaries might their coalition begin to transgress?

We invite papers on any and all of these preliminary questions. We particularly welcome papers that combine theoretical reflection with empirical analysis in exploring and examining the intersections of ‘religion’, ‘gender’ and ‘postcoloniality’. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted by email to CGRR@soas.ac.uk.

Deadline: 29th June 2012

The primary purpose of the workshop will be to identify strategic areas for future research in the area, contributing to the development and enrichment of the interdisciplinary study of religion and gender from the perspective of postcolonial theory and to create a network for future research collaboration and exchange. Selected papers from the workshop will be published in the international journal Religion and Gender.

Contacts: Dr Sîan Hawthorne (sh79@soas.ac.uk) and Dr Adriaan van Klinken (a.van.klinken@soas.ac.uk)

Centre for Gender and Religions Research, Department of the Study of Religions, School of Oriental & African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG

Centre email: CGRR@soas.ac.uk

http://cgrr.wordpress.com


Rethinking Religion in India IV

Call for papers

The deadline for submission of abstracts and proposals is 15 August 2012.


*The Impact of Religion:

Challenges for Society, Law and Democracy*

An interdisciplinary conference at Uppsala University

Uppsala, Sweden, 20-22 May 2013

Submissions are invited on the following themes, which – broadly speaking – mirror the Impact programme. Further sub-themes will be developed as the submitted papers arrive; these will be displayed on the conference website. Papers on comparative research are particularly welcome.  Theoretical, methodological and substantive issues will be given equal weight.

A variety of formats are envisaged:  plenary sessions, paper sessions, roundtables, academic exchanges and policy debates. Please indicate your preference when you submit your abstract. Pre-organised sessions are welcome.

•                    Religious and social change – including the role of the media in these shifts

•                    Integration, democracy and political culture

•                    Families, law and society

•                    Well-being and health

•                    Welfare models – their organization and values

•                    Science and religion

Deadline for the submission of abstracts (max 200 words): *30th November 2012*

The conference is hosted by *The Impact of Religion programme* and *Uppsala Religion and Society Research Centre* at Uppsala University.

Up to date information on the programme, registration, abstract format, venue etc. will be made available at: http://www.impactofreligion.uu.se, where you also find more details about the Impact of Religion programme itself.


Spirituality and spiritual movements in Hungary and Eastern Central Europe 11th Szeged Conference on Ethnology of Religion Szeged, 10-12 October 2012

Spirituality and spiritual movements in Hungary

and Eastern Central Europe

11th Szeged Conference on Ethnology of Religion

Szeged, 10-12 October 2012

Venue: University of Szeged, Conference Room of the Arts Faculty, 6722 Szeged, Egyetem u. 2. fszt.

In November 2012 Pope Benedict XVI is launching the “Year of Faith”. This is an occasion for us to examine the forms taken by manifestations of faith, historically and in our time, in religious life and the whole of religious culture.

Faith is manifested differently in different historical periods, among different social strata, in different age groups, occupational groups and by place of residence, among men and women, children and adults, and linguistic/ethnic features can also be discovered (or are thought to exist). And naturally, it is manifested differently in all those contexts within the various Christian and non-Christian denominations.

We welcome for the conference concrete empirical case studies that deal with manifestations of spirituality in word, action/rhythm, in art (representational arts, poetry, music, architecture, applied arts: metalwork, embroidery, etc.), in pedagogy (e.g. religious instruction); that take a social approach to both lay or clerical communities (characteristics of the spirituality of orders, monastic schools, third orders, charismatics, Focolare and other spirituality), especially to the 19th-20th century movements (Legion of Mary, Schönstatt, etc.), or spiritual movements associated with beatification and canonisation procedures in the 20th-21st centuries (Saint Margaret of Hungary, István Kaszap, Mária Bogner, etc.); and which examine the presentation of these spiritualities/cults in the press, their small printed materials, periodicals, manuscript legacy, aim; which analyse the growing ecumenical movements of the turn of the 20th-21st century, as well as the virtual communities.

We also welcome papers on the life and spirituality of religious but not church-type associations, such as charitable associations, denominational reading circles, youth movements and circles, etc.

On behalf of our department and the Sándor Bálint Institute for Research on Religion we respectfully invite applications for participation in the conference from Hungarian ethnologists, folklorists and anthropologists, as well as art historians, literary historians, photography historians, cultural historians, theologians, church historians, liturgical historians, music historians, dance researchers, educators, sociologists, philosophers, psychologists and representatives of other disciplines.

The conference will have a Hungarian and an international section, the languages of the conference will be Hungarian, English and German.

Papers can be on any theme within the range of themes listed. Our circular is intended as a general guide rather than setting strict frames covering all aspects.

Papers should be 20 minutes (approx. 13,000 characters) in length including any illustrations, and will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

Deadline for applications: 15 June 2012

The organisers reserve the right to accept or reject papers. Depending on the interest shown, the conference is planned to last two or three days. Students may also apply to participate without presenting a paper. Applications should be submitted on the attached form with an abstract of the proposed paper.

Costs

Participants are to cover their own costs. The participation fee of 5,000 HUF covers participation in the work of the conference sections, attendance at auxiliary events and refreshments during the breaks.

Accommodation can be provided at a very favourable rate (approx. 3,800 HUF/night) in university guest rooms and 2-3-bed hostel rooms (most of these have shared bathroom in the corridor) if reserved in advance through the Department of Ethnology. The cost of accommodation is to be paid by participants at the place of accommodation. To make a reservation in a hotel, pension or guest house in Szeged, visit

http://www.iranymagyarorszag.hu/keres/szeged/szallasok-p1/ , where accommodation to suit your requirements can be found if you make your reservation in time (!).

Participants make their own arrangements for meals in restaurants and university canteens in the vicinity of the conference venue.

Books for sale

During the conference we are planning to offer books for sale. If you have a publication that fits into the theme of the conference or more broadly the field of ethnology of religion, we will be happy to handle sales on the basis of prior agreement.

Please send your application by the deadline to barna@hung.u-szeged.hu.


NEW COURSE


MA in Dialogue Studies

School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE), Keele University, UK

The MA in Dialogue Studies is designed for graduates who wish to examine and understand theories of dialogue and their applications in peace-building and in developing intercultural understanding and social cohesion. While definitions of “dialogue” will be explored in the course of the year, it might be loosely defined here as “a range of activities, including but not confined to discussion, through which people of different social, cultural and religious groups deliberately come together for meaningful and constructive interaction.” The MA course explores the theory and practice of dialogue through a unique combination of taught subjects, research, skills-based training and a London-based internship.

The course fills a gap in postgraduate education provision by not only exploring the use of dialogue in conflict and post-conflict situations but also examining its use in combating discrimination, ghettoisation and extremism in countries such as the UK. The main core module accordingly both introduces dialogue for peace-building and explores the UK context for dialogue, drawing on the fields of sociology and history as well as politics.

The degree has a practical outlook and will equip students with knowledge, understanding and skills to effectively engage in and lead dialogue to advance intercultural interaction and understanding and social cohesion. It includes a work placement during which students will gain professional experience with the Dialogue Society. Practical elements will be supported by rigorous, reflective examination of the approaches of governmental and nongovernmental agencies to dialogue, social cohesion and reconciliation. The course’s broad scope and interdisciplinary nature will encourage students to bring broad perspectives to bear on any specific local issues with which they engage professionally.

Students will be able to pursue their particular interests within the degree’s broad remit through a wide choice of elective taught modules and through their dissertation. It will accordingly be possible for each student to choose whether to devote more attention to domestic or to international contexts for dialogue and whether to focus on its applications in peacebuilding or in the promotion of social cohesion.

The course consists of:

•Core module 1: Approaches in Dialogue

•Core module 2: Power, Knowledge and the World

•2 elective taught modules

•A work placement at the Dialogue Society, with practical experience, further training, meetings at relevant government departments and NGOs, and trips exploring multicultural London

•A 15,000 word dissertation

Who is it for?

•Students wishing to explore the theory and practice of intercultural dialogue in the UK context, and in conflict situations abroad

•Professionals and aspiring academics interested in core social issues such as intercultural dialogue, community relations and citizenship

•Activists and dialogue practitioners looking to develop their understanding of relevant social theory while enhancing essential dialogue skills

The MA offers:

•A cutting-edge combination of taught academic subjects, research, skills-based training and internship

•A postgraduate course designed and delivered in partnership by Keele University’s internationally renowned School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy, and the Dialogue Society, a dynamic London-based dialogue charity

•A broad range of elective modules allowing students to pursue their own particular academic interests

•A head start in professional experience through an internship at the Dialogue Society in the heart of multicultural London

•Cultivation of an unusually wide range of valuable transferable skills, comprising academic, professional and personal skills

•Bursaries available to overseas students through the Dialogue Society in addition to those bursaries offered by SPIRE to selected postgraduates

•Quality research training and support

Aims of the Course

The course aims to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to develop a critical understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to dialogue, peace-building and community cohesion. This understanding will be supported by understanding of key contexts for dialogue, in the UK and in selected conflict situations. The course also aims to equip students with practical skills to engage in and lead intercultural dialogue, chiefly through the professional experience and training provided through the Dialogue Society placement. Further, the course will prepare students for research and support them in producing a dissertation on their chosen topic.

Career Destination Information

The Dialogue Studies Masters is aimed at people who wish to pursue careers in a whole range of sectors. It is relevant to those wishing to gain employment in the civil or government service at the sub-national, national or global level, or to those looking to work with sub-national, national or international NGOs. The course will also be a good preparation for further postgraduate study and is ideally suited to those interested in pursuing study of the theory and practice of dialogue at PhD level and beyond.

In addition, students will graduate with a range of transferable skills beneficial in any number of contexts. These skills will include at least: cultural sensitivity, empathy, teamwork and leadership skills, project management skills, research skills, public speaking skills, ability to lead and chair discussions, dialogue facilitation skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Course Structure and Content

All students will complete two core taught modules as follows:

1.     Approaches to Dialogue (30 credits)

This module will place the practice of dialogue in the context of key concepts, debates and positions relating to multiculturalism, political community and citizenship in Britain and other national contexts. It will explore social, demographic and political issues in the recent (1945-present) history of immigration in Britain including public and political debates about diversity during this period. It will critically review British national state policies for the management of diversity since 1945, focusing on their ideological underpinnings (including multiculturalism, integration and cohesion). Current political and theoretical debates about multiculturalism will inform analysis of the limits and possibilities for dialogue.

The module will focus primarily on the UK context for dialogue. However, select case studies from other national contexts (e.g. Yugoslavia, South Africa) will be drawn upon to critically explore opportunities for, and barriers to, conflict resolution and peace building.

2.     Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)

This module aims to provide a foundation in the philosophy of the social sciences and an examination of the core assumptions that underpin different approaches to knowledge generation. It also aims to provide an understanding of the politics and international relations of knowledge generation and circulation. In other words, it examines how social scientists have approached the questions of what to study, how to study, and the ways in which these issues are bound up with historical and current power structures in the world.

The module will prepare students to engage critically and reflectively with the content of the MA course and to undertake the research involved in writing their dissertation.

Elective Modules

Students will be able to pursue their own interests related to theories, practices and contexts for dialogue in choosing from an eclectic range of elective modules.

Elective modules will be chosen from a wide range of SPIRE modules. It may also be possible for students to take modules in Politics, Diplomatic Studies, Management, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Public Policy and History. The precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

SPIRE modules:

•                Power, Knowledge and the World

•                Environmental Decision Making: the Case of Complex Technologies

•                Global Environmental Change

•                The Theory of Global Security

•                Contemporary Political Philosophy

•                Environmental Ethics

•                Contesting International Relations

•                Parties and Democracy

•                The Changing International Agenda

•                Comparative European Politics

•                Environmental Movements: North and South

•                Environmental Problems and Policies in the US

•                Diplomatic Law

•                Dimensions of Environmental Politics

•                Environmental Diplomacy

•                The Politics of Sin: Culture Wars in the US

•                Race and Justice: Civil Rights in the US

Relevant modules from other Schools:

NB not all these modules will be available every year and they will not always be compatible with Dialogue Studies students’ core commitments.

* Public Policy modules allowing students to expand their understanding of a key element of UK society which may significantly influence intercultural and interreligious relations and social cohesion. Relevant modules include:

* Politics, Political Economy and Public Policy: Explaining and Making Public Policy (MA Public Policy, School of Public Policy and Professional Practice)

* Policy Implementation and Governance: Policy in Action (30 credits, MA Public Policy, School of Public Policy and Professional Practice)

* Global Media and Culture modules giving students the opportunity to develop understanding of key factors shaping British and international contexts for dialogue: globalisation and media in contemporary culture. Relevant modules include:

* Globalisation, Culture, Society (MA Global Media and Culture, Humanities)

* Contemporary Cultural and Media Theory (MA Global Media and Culture, Humanities)

* Sociology modules, through which students may deepen their understanding of the UK context for dialogue. Relevant modules include:

* City Cultures (MA Urban Futures and Sustainable Communities, School of Sociology and Criminology)

* Urban Governance and Policy Making (MA Urban Futures and Sustainable Communities, School of Sociology and Criminology)

* History modules

* Imperialism (BA History, School of Humanities)

* Right-Wing Movements in Inter-War Europe (BA History, School of Humanities)

* Africa Since 1800 (BA History, School of Humanities)

* Management School skills modules, through which students may pursue valuable professional development to enhance their future career

* Leading People

* People, Processes and Operations

* Right-Wing Movements (20 credits, adapted from BA History, School of Humanities)

Students may also choose to study a modern foreign language (other than English).

Work Placement

10-week placement at the Dialogue Society during the Spring semester (30 credits). Students’ activities will include:

• Helping London-based community centres to branch out and run dialogue projects to bring local communities together, with the support of Dialogue Society staff and resources. Students will work in small teams and will each have the opportunity to manage a small-scale dialogue project. 2011 projects included a seminar on knife crime for local residents, Mothers’ Day visits to local care homes with children who use the community centres, and an official opening celebration for one community centre.

• Supporting ongoing Dialogue Society projects and events.

• Attending weekly sessions at the Dialogue Society’s Dialogue School. This will enable students to further explore and discuss different approaches to dialogue as well as providing training in a number of key skills for organised dialogue.

• Networking at external events.

• Exploring the cultural, religious and political landscape of multicultural London through visits to relevant government departments, other dialogue NGOs, places of worship and areas of particular historical/cultural interest. The 2011 placement included visits to the Department for Communities and Local Government, the Home Office and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, a historical tour of East London and visits to a Gurdwara, a Buddhist Centre and a Synagogue.

• Keeping records of the placement and producing a reflective diary.

Assessment

·       Examination of taught modules will be by written coursework and assessment of tutorial performance only (no written examinations)

The work placement will be assessed on:

·       Attendance

·       Performance and management of assigned tasks

·       The student’s written plans and records

·       The student’s placement diary

·       Students demonstrating an outstanding level of work will receive their degree with distinction.

Funding

SPIRE offers a limited number of bursaries to postgraduate students. Details are available on SPIRE’s website.

The Dialogue Society offers a limited number of bursaries for the Dialogue Studies MA postgraduate degree. The bursary only covers the difference between overseas and home fee rate. Effectively therefore, successful students will only pay University fee at home fee rate. To apply for a Dialogue Society bursary, students must first receive an offer from Keele University for this degree.

Further information

For further information please visit:

http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgapply/

http://www.keele.ac.uk/spire/postgraduatecourses/madialoguestudies/

http://www.dialoguesociety.org/master/dialogue-studies-ma.html

image of books

Religious Studies Opportunities Digest (25 May 2012) – Jobs, Seminars, Books, Conferences and more…

25 May 2012 Issue

image of booksWe are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources. If you have any content for future digests, please contact us via the various options on our ‘contact’ page.

In this issue:

  • Advanced Notice – Journals
  • New Books
  • Conference Announcements
  • Jobs
  • Scholarships
  • Calls for Papers
  • Seminars

ADVANCED NOTICE – JOURNALS


Culture and Religion, vol 13, issue 2, 2012 http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcar20/13/2

Sociology of Religion, May 2012, http://socrel.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/recent?etoc

Journal of Korean Religions, Volume 3, Number 1 (April 2012). Guest edited by Boudewijn Walraven and titled “Late Chosŏn Buddhism,” this issue adds to the body of work challenging stereotypical appraisals of the Buddhist world of the Chosŏn dynasty. http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_korean_religions.


NEW BOOKS

Buddhism Across Boundaries: The Interplay of Indian, Chinese, and Central Asian Source Materials, edited by John R. McRae and Jan Nattier.

Download: http://sino-platonic.org/complete/spp222_indian_chinese_buddhism.pdf


CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS


The University of Bucharest

The Faculty of Letters

The “Goldstein-Goren” Center of Jewish Studies

 

International Conference on

The Jews of the Mediterranean

Bucharest, New Europe College, 24-25 May 2012

Conference Program

Thursday 24th of May 2012

1st Session

Chair and opening remarks: Andrei Oişteanu, Institutul pentru Istoria Religiilor – Academia Română, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti

10.00 Opening of the Works of the Conference

10.15 Anca Manolescu, Cercetător şi publicist: Filon din Alexandria şi întâlnirea religiilor ca filozofii (Philon of Alexandria and the Phylosophical Encounter of Religions)

10.40 Andrei Cornea, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren”, Secţia de Studii Europene – Universitatea din Bucureşti: The Jewish Shabbat – A Day of Fast?

11.05 – 11.20 Coffee Break

11.20 Adrian Pirtea, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti, Freie Universiät, Berlin:  Late Byzantine Jewry and the Transfer of Islamic Esotericism to Europe

11.45 Cristina Ciucu, CNRS, Paris: (Again) on Tzimtzum and Exile – On the Circulation of Some Kabbalistic Ideas in the Mediterranean World during the 15th.-16th. Centuries

12.10 – 12.30 Discussions

12.30 – 14.30 Lunch

2nd. Session

Chair: Andrei Cornea, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren”, Secţia de Studii Europene – Universitatea din Bucureşti

15.00 Roberto Bachmann, Portuguese Association of Jewish Studies, Lisbon: The Portuguese Jewish and Marrano Diaspora and Their Integration among the Mediterranean (Jewish) Communities upon Their Exodus from Portugal after 1506

15.25 Măriuca Stanciu, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti, Biblioteca Academiei Române: Jewish Dukes and Romanian Voievodas – On the Ties between the Sephardic Ottoman Elite and Romanian Princes

15.50 Ivan Biliarsky, Bulgarian Academy of Science, Varna University: Two Documents Concerning the Matrimonial Relations among the Balkan Jews in the Late Middle Ages

16.15 Carol Iancu, Université „Paul Valery”, Montpellier: Evreii din Marsilia: un secol de istorie, de la Revoluţia Franceză la Afacerea Dreyfus

16.40 – 17.00 Discussions

17.00 More discussions over a glass of Rotenberg wine

Friday 25th of May 2012

1st Session

Chair: Liviu Rotman, SNSPA, CSIER, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti

10.00 Silvia Planas Marce, Museu d’Historia des Jueus i L”Institut d’Estudis „Nahmanides”, Girona: Daughers of Sarah, Mothers of Israel, Jewish Women of Girona

10.25 Minna Rozen, Haifa University: Romans in Istanbul: Tombstones and Manuscripts Tell the Story of a Jewish Family

10.50 Delia Bălăican, Biblioteca Academiei Române: Tipografia Samitca în viaţa urbei craiovene la sfârşitul secolului al XIX-lea şi începutul secolului XX (The Samitca Printing Press Co. and Its Influence on Craiova Urban Development during the Late 19th  and the Beginning of the 20th. centuries

11.15 – 11.30  Coffee Break

11.30 Victor Neumann Universitatea de Vest, Filiala Academiei Române, Timisoara:

Sefarzi şi ashkenazi în oraşele transilvano-bănăţene în secolele XVII- XVIII (Sephardim and Ashkenazim in Transylvania and Banat cities during the 17th – 18th centuries)

11.55 Yolanda Constantinescu, Academia de Muzica, CRIFS, Academia Română, Bucureşti: O privire asupra personalităţii lui Dimitrie Cantmir: sefarzi şi muzica sefardă (On Dimitrie Cantemir’s Personality Regarding the Sephardim and Sephardic Music)

12.20- 12.45 Discussions

12.45 – 15.00 Lunch

2nd Session

Chair: Mariuca Stanciu, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti, Biblioteca Academiei Române:

15.00 Karen Gerson Sarhon, Ottoman-Turkish Sephardic Culture Research Center, Istanbul: The Ladino Database Project Results as insight to the Current Situation of Judeo-Spanish in Turkey

15.25 Liviu Rotman, SNSPA, CSIER, Centrul de Studii Ebraice “Goldstein Goren” – Universitatea din Bucureşti: Continuitate şi înnoire în comunitatea sefardă din Bucureşti în a doua jumătate a secolului al XIX-lea (Continuity and Renewal within the Bucharest Sephardic Community during the 2nd. Half of the 19th. Century)

15.50 Cristina Toma, Societatea Romana de Radio: Bucureşti – panoramă sefardă (Bucharest – A Sephardic Outlook)

16.15 Alina Popescu, Centrul de Studii Ebraice „Goldstein-Goren”, Universitatea din. Bucureşti, Biblioteca Academiei Române, Bucuresti: Bucureştiul sefard şi sinagogile sale (Sephardic Bucharest and Its Synagogues)

16.40 Discussions

17.00 Closing of the works of the conference


Title: The annual two day conference hosted by the

Interdisciplinary Association for Philosophy & Religious

Studies (IAPRS)will be held at Edinboro University in April

2013

Location: Pennsylvania

Date: 2013-04-01

Description: The annual two day conference hosted by the

Interdisciplinary Association for Philosophy & Religious

Studies (IAPRS)will be held at Edinboro University in April

2013 (specific dates to be announced later). The conference

features undergraduate, graduate, and faculty presentations on

any topic in phi …

Contact: ssullivan@edinboro.edu

URL: www.sshe-iaprs.org/

Announcement ID: 194543

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194543


JOBS


University of Toronto – Scarborough, Humanities, Tung Lin Kok Yuen Visiting Professor in Buddhist Studies

Details: https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44550

Applications, consisting of a statement of interest with some indication of how a candidate will contribute to the Universitys programs (at most two pages), accompanied by a curriculum vitae,should be sent to buddhist-studies-search [at] utsc.utoronto.ca. The search committee reserves the right to ask for further materials from shortlisted candidates.

If electronic submission is not possible, applications may be mailed to:

TLKY Visiting Professor Search

Professor William Bowen, Chair

Department of Humanities

University of Toronto Scarborough

1265 Military Trail

Toronto, ON M1C 1A4

Canada

The deadline for applications is May 30, 2012.


Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Stirling

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AEL392/lectureship-in-philosophy/

Grade 7 £31,222 to £35,939

Full time

Fixed term: 1 September 2012 – 31 December 2013

Job Reference: SCH00039

For further information, including details on how to apply, please see www.stir.ac.uk/jobs

Closing date: Monday 11 June 2012


Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Aberdeen

College / University Administration: College of Arts & Social Sciences

Position Type: Full-time

University Grade Structure: Grade 7

Salary From: £37,012. Salary To: £44,166.

Details: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AEM086/lecturer-in-philosophy/

Application process: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/thefuture/

The closing date for the receipt of applications is 22 June 2012.


SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL AND AFRICAN STUDIES

University of London

Lecturer in Anthropology

£39,146 – £46,300 p.a. inclusive of London Allowance

Vacancy No: 000392

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London invites applications for a permanent lectureship tenable from September 2012. Preference will be given to a candidate able to teach the ethnography of West or East Africa at undergraduate and Master’s level. The successful candidate would be expected to teach and develop other courses, assume normal administrative tasks including PhD supervision and must have an outstanding publication record.

You must have a PhD in Social Anthropology. It is expected that you will have expertise relevant to the vision and strategy of the School, including a strong interest in issues of particular importance to the developing world.

To apply for this vacancy or to download a job description/further information, please visit www.soas.ac.uk/jobs<http://www.soas.ac.uk/jobs>.

Closing date:  14th June 2012

Interviews are provisionally scheduled for week commencing: 16th July 2012


Please follow the link below for two new academic job opportunities in Theology and Religion at Durham. Please note the deadline of 8th June. I’d be happy to respond to any minor, informal enquiries. For formal enquiries or detailed questions, please contact my colleague and Head of Dept, Dr Robert Song (robert.song@durham.ac.uk).

http://www.joindurham.com/professorships/vacancies/search/category/arts-and-humanities


Arizona State University – Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science and

Religion

<http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44588>


Managing Editor/ Open Access Books in Theology, Religious Studies.

We are currently looking for candidates for Managing Editors for our Open Access Books program in Theology, Religious Studies, launched by Versita (www.versita.com).

Scholarly monographs and other book categories have been an important format of scholarly communication. For various reasons in the last decades they have faced significant challenges. We believe that Open Access may yield the best available solution for keeping academic monographs and other scholarly books alive. Open Access provides free and unrestricted online access to electronic books for all interested users. This model grows readership by hundreds or thousands of times versus the printed book. To cover the publication costs, we will charge a moderate fee to the institution supporting the author. However, for the first year or two we have decided to waive these fees, so we will neither charge the reader (or librarian) nor the author.

With over 250 Open Access journals in its portfolio Versita (www.versita.com) is one of the leading scholarly Open Access Publishers. Versita cooperates with Springer (www.springer.com) and in January 2012 the company was acquired by de Gruyter (www.degruyter.com), a prominent scholarly publisher with a 260-year history.

IDEAL CANDIDATE PROFILE

Ideal candidates should hold a PhD in the above mentioned discipline and have experience in both conducting research and teaching. They should have sufficient time available to complete their duties. Editorial experience is not required. Candidates must speak native or fluent English, be proficient in using computers, and have constant access to Internet.

BRIEF JOB DESCRIPTION

The Managing Editor’s chief responsibility is launching a program for the publication of scholarly books in Open Access model in the above mentioned discipline. The Managing Editor solicits and evaluates book proposals submitted by authors from around the world and coordinates work of other editors who solicit books in their discipline. The Managing Editor is also expected to cooperate with authors, reviewers and copy editors.

WHAT WE OFFER IN RETURN

Compensation is based on the number of books published under Managing Editor’s supervision. You will get a chance to combine publishing activities with academic and pedagogic work and have a unique opportunity to acquire experience in and understanding of professional scientific publishing while taking part in a pioneering project in a dynamically developing company.

If you are interested in this position, please send a cover letter and a CV (both documents in English) to hr12@versita.com  with “Managing Editor, Theology, Religious Studies” as your subject line.

If you wish to participate in our Open Access Books program as an author and submit a new book proposal in your discipline, please fill in our New Book Proposal Form available at http://www.versita.com/Book_Author/Form/ and return it in by e-mail to info@versita.com.

Versita offers its authors:

•    fair and comprehensive peer-review of submitted proposals and manuscripts, English language copy-editing by native English speaking specialists in the field (in some subject areas we accept also manuscripts in other languages)

•    professional composition of the manuscript in PDF format

•    hosting the book on MetaPress platform, which offers many functionalities, e.g. active links in references

•    printed copies sold to libraries and individuals, by Versita and distributors (e.g. Amazon)

•    complimentary printed copies for book author and editors

•    royalties for the author from print copy sales

•    indexing by Google and other search engines

•    e-book delivery to libraries and full-text repositories (e.g. Google Book Search)

•    Creative Commons copyright license

More information on our Open Access book publishing program can be found at http://versita.com/Book_Author/


SCHOLARSHIPS


Guest Scholarships 2012 CRC 933 “Material Text Cultures”

The Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 933 “Material Text Cultures. Materiality and Presence

of Writing in Non-Typographic Societies” has been established by the German Research Founda

tion in July 2011 at Heidelberg University (collaborating partner: College of Jewish Studies, Hei

delberg). Researchers working in the field of cultural studies will investigate the material presence of writing in “non-typographic societies” that do not possess any or any widespread methods for the mass production of writing. Based on this investigation, those receptive practices are presented which in all probability took place at the writing due to its material presence. The ‘material text cultures’ thus identified in non-typographical societies will then be systematically described and compared with those of typographical societies. The fundamental research by the CRC 933 “Material Text Cultures” on text-bearing artefacts, especially those of the circum-Mediterranean zone, will be performed within a conceptual framework that has been developed from recent approaches in cultural studies.

The Research Training Group „Text Anthropology“ of the CRC 933 is now looking for guest graduate students with outstanding qualifications who can show that participating in the interdisciplinary research of the CRC 933 “Material Text Cultures” will be beneficial to their doctoral project and to the CRC 933. The Research Training Group offers a monthly scholarship of 1.250 Euros starting on October 1st 2012. Furthermore, it supports scholarship holders in offering graduate courses and individual mentoring. The scholarship is granted for one year.

Applicants, who should hold an M.A. or equivalent in a discipline of the humanities with an above-

average grade, should send their written applications (including a CV, a letter of intent, a project proposal and a letter of recommendation from their supervisor) with reference to “CRC 933” by July 15th 2012 at the latest to SFB 933 „Materiale Textkulturen“, Heidelberg Zentrum Kulturelles Erbe, Marstallstraße 6, 69117 Heidelberg/Germany. We regret that we cannot return application documents sent to us by regular mail. Details may be requested at danijel.cubelic@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de.

The University of Heidelberg actively seeks to raise the proportion of female employees in all previously under-represented areas. In keeping with this, applications are particularly requested from women with the appropriate qualifications. In the case of equal qualifications, severely disabled persons will receive priority.


CALLS FOR PAPERS

CFP: The Journal of Korean Religions (JKR) is published biannually, every April and October, by the Institute for the Study of Religion, Sogang University, Korea. It aims to promote interest in and discuss the study of Korean religions in various academic disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. A peer-reviewed journal, JKR publishes articles of original research, review articles, book reviews, and current issues which seek to discuss, elaborate, and extend the study of Korean religions. Our work is featured in both print and digital form, published by the University of Hawai’i and served online by Project MUSE: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_korean_religions.

JKR invites contributions from scholars researching on any aspect of Korean religions from a wide range of perspectives, including religious studies, philosophy, theology, literature, folklore, art, anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. Articles submitted for consideration should not have appeared or be under review for publication elsewhere. JKR also welcomes book reviews and review articles. All submissions and inquiries should be sent to the Managing Editor: journalkr[at]sogang.ac.kr. Submission guidelines can be found at: http://bit.ly/JKRsubguide.


Call for Papers

Demons and Illness: Theory and Practice from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

Centre for Medical History, University of Exeter

22 – 24th April 2013

In many near eastern traditions, demons appear as a cause of illness: most famously in the stories of possessed people cured by Christ. These traditions influenced perceptions of illness in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in later centuries but the ways in which these cultures viewed demons and illness have received comparatively little attention. For example, who were these demons? How did they cause illness? Why did they want to? How did demons fit into other explanations for illness? How could demonic illnesses be cured and how did this relate to other kinds of cure? How far did medical or philosophical theory affect how people responded to demonic illnesses in practice?

This conference will take a comparative approach, taking a wide geographical and chronological sweep but confining itself to this relatively specific set of questions. Because Jewish, Christian and Islamic ideas about demons and illness drew on a similar heritage of ancient religious texts from New Testament times to the early modern period there is real scope to draw meaningful comparisons between the different periods and cultures. What were the common assumptions made by different societies? When and why did they differ? What was the relationship between theory and practice? We would welcome papers which address these issues for any period between antiquity and the early modern period, and which discuss Christian, Jewish or Islamic traditions.

The conference is hosted by the Centre for Medical History at the University of Exeter, on April 22nd-24th, 2013. Please send abstracts by 15th September 2012 to the conference organizers, Catherine Rider and Siam Bhayro, Centre for Medical History, University of Exeter: email c.r.rider@exeter.ac.uk or s.bhayro@exeter.ac.uk.


The Board of Editors of the interdisciplinary journal Quaderni di Studi Indo-Mediterranei

(http://www2.lingue.unibo.it/studi indo-mediterranei/ ; (http://qusim.arts.ubc.ca/)

is soliciting contributions to its sixth thematic volume, scheduled to appear in 2013.

This issue will contain twelve to fifteen essays addressing the theme of the cultural

and religious interactions between Hebraism, Christianity and Islam.


The “Three Rings” parable, known in Western culture mainly through Boccaccio’s

novella in the Decameron and Lessing’s Nathan der Weise, has been subject to research

for a hundred years or so. Some scholars have argued that the parable originated in

Spain, but its exact source remains unknown. In any case, the emergence and

development of his suggestive message, including the eight and sixteenth centuries,

evidently origins in the Mediterranean context of intercultural and inter-religious

relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

In particular, Western esotericism has been characterised as the combination of

Alexandrian Hermeticism, Neo-Platonism and related religious philosophies of late

antiquity and the traces each has left in the three Abrahamic religions. For this

process, very important was the uninterrupted translation of texts between Arabic,

Latin and Hebrew languages. Still today these three Mediterranean cultures are mixed

together in narrow and interesting plots.

All aspects of the cultural connections between Hebraism, Christianity and Islam in

history of religions, theology, philosophy, mysticism, esotericism, literature, visual

arts, music and folklore are welcome.

Please send proposals for essays (250 to 350 words) accompanied by a bio-

bibliographical sketch to Alessandro Grossato (alessandro.grossato@lett.unitn.it), by

September 30, 2012.

Quaderni di Studi Indo-Mediterranei accepts proposals and essays in all major European

languages. The editors of the volume will strive for a balanced and diversified table of

contents. They will confirm accepted submissions by December 2, 2012.

Subsequently, the final deadline for submitting the completed essays will be June 1,

  1. The average length recommended for each contribution is of 6,000 words, with

a maximum length allowed of 7,000 words, including footnotes and bibliographical

references.


The journal Quaderni di Studi Indo-Mediterranei is based at the University of Bologna,

Italy, and is supported by ASTREA (Associazione di Studi e Ricerche Euro-

Asiatiche). Editor in Chief: Carlo Saccone; Board of Editors: Daniela Boccassini,

Alessandro Grossato, Carlo Saccone.

The journal counts among its editorial associates world-renowned specialists from

major European and North American Universities.

For further information on the journal’s mission and an overview of previous issues

please go to: http://www2.lingue.unibo.it/studi indo-mediterranei/ (Italian website)

http://qusim.arts.ubc.ca/ (North American website)

Quaderni di Studi Indo-Mediterranei is committed to upholding a high profile in

comparative studies and the highest standards of peer-reviewed scholarship.


Title: Special Issue on Religion and the Paranormal

Date: 2012-08-01

Description: The journal Nova Religio is currently seeking papers

for a special issue on religion and the paranormal. In the last

few years, several good books have appeared that consider

so-called paranormal beliefs, discourses, and experiences as an

object of inquiry for religion scholars. Like the category re

Contact: jlay@bu.edu

Announcement ID: 194634

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194634


SEMINARS


An Open Meeting at St. Marylebone Church, 17 Marylebone Road,

London NW1 5LT

Thursday 14th June 2012 from 2-4pm

THE UNIQUENESS OF SPIRITUAL CARE

Making the spiritual real: from research into training and practice

The challenge for all mental health services is to integrate spiritual care within care

planning in order that those who use the services receive true holistic care. Using a

combination of training, research and care planning Nigel will outline a research

project he has undertaken in partnership with nurses to deliver high quality spiritual

care. It is his belief that those of us engaged in delivering spiritual care need to base

all provision of care upon the foundation of robust research. He will outline the

model of research that he believes to be appropriate for researching the effectiveness

of spiritual care.

DR NIGEL COPSEY is the Team Leader for Spiritual Care in the East London

Foundation Trust and Surrey and Borders Partnership Foundation Trust. He has

published two research papers in the field of psychiatry and mental health for

the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health. He has also contributed to a number of

psychotherapy publications in the area of spirituality and mental health. Nigel is a

visiting lecturer at several London Universities as well as being a Programme

Leader in the psychology department of UEL. Nigel is an Anglican priest and an

accredited psychotherapist.

To register for this free seminar contact: info@mhspirituality.org.uk

Map and more information on the venue (on Jubilee Line, Baker Street Station)

obtainable on this link:

www.stmarylebone.org.uk/HandC01.htm

For more information about the National Spirituality and Mental Health

Forum see website: www.mhspirituality.org.uk


Centre for Child and Youth Research, Brunel University

 A QUESTION OF RELIGION: YOUNG PEOPLE and identity IN CONTEMPORARY MULTI-FAITH BRITAIN

Friday, 29th June 2012

10.30am – 4.30pm

MS114, Mary Seacole Building, Brunel University

Chair: Professor Judith Harwin, Centre for Child and Youth Research, Brunel University

10.30 – 10.50      Refreshments

10.50 – 11.00      Welcome to the seminar!

11.00 – 11.50      Young British Muslims finding their voice: from alienation to engagement

Dr Philip Lewis, Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford

Young British Muslims are developing the confidence to engage British society and make the most of the institutional spaces opening up in which they can participate. This paper explores some of the encouraging debates now being heard – not least British Muslims contributing ‘Islamically’ to debates within education, social services and chaplaincy. It also addresses how intergenerational tensions are being played out by referring to a seismic political change in Bradford where the Respect candidate recently defeated the Labour candidate in one of the safest Labour seats. The important development from Islamist to post-Islamist politics is also discussed.

 

11.50 – 12.40      Young Sikhs

Jasjit Singh, University of Leeds

This presentation will outline findings from doctoral research on religious transmission among young British Sikhs (18-30). Focusing on a number of arenas of transmission including families, Sikh camps and the internet, this presentation will outline the ways in which these various arenas allow young British Sikhs to engage with their faith. It will also demonstrate how many religious identity practices result from religious socialisation in the family.

12.40 – 13.30      LUNCH

13.30 – 14.20      The Youth On Religion project: Young people and the negotiation of identity in three diverse urban locations

                               Professor Nicola Madge, Centre for Child and Youth Research, Brunel University

The Youth On Religion project surveyed over ten thousand young people, and talked to over 160, in secondary schools and colleges in the London Boroughs of Hillingdon and Newham, and Bradford in Yorkshire. Participants came from a range of faith and non-faith positions, and provided a wealth of information on the meaning of religion in their young lives. It was very apparent that families guided their initial religious direction but that peers, school, the community and their own personal experiences and agency became increasingly important as they grew older. This presentation examines the meaning of religious identity for young people and documents some of the landmarks they pass in their religious journey.

14.20 – 15.00      YORvoice: Youth On Religion

Young people from the London Borough of Hillingdon, who participated in YORvoice, part of the Youth On Religion project, present some of their views on religion and its impact on young lives.

15.00 – 15.15      TEA AND BISCUITS

15.15 – 16.00      Growing up with disability in Pakistani Muslim families

Dr Debbie Kramer-Roy, Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, Brunel University

This paper presents findings from a study of Pakistani Muslim families bringing up disabled children. Religion was a strong part of their daily lives, and parents talked about how personal faith influenced the way they experienced becoming the parents of disabled children and living with them in their communities. While mothers tended to talk about the shift from feelings of distress and shame to considering their child a blessing from God, fathers reported how they turned to religious leaders and scriptures to learn more about disability and its meaning. Siblings reported generally positive views but also indicated some frustration at the restrictions that a disabled brother or sister imposed.

16.00                     END OF SEMINAR

NB There is no charge for this seminar and lunch is provided

If you would like to attend, please email nicola.madge@brunel.ac.uk


Title: Summer Institute at Rutgers – Islam and the Muslim World –

July 16th-20th

Location: New Jersey

Date: 2012-07-16

Description: 2012 Summer Institute for Teachers at Rutgers Islam

and the Muslim World Where: Rutgers, the State University of

New JerseyNew Brunswick, NJ When: Monday, July 16 to Friday,

July 20, 2012 Cost: $300 The Center for Middle East Studies at

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, is pleased to anno

Contact: areolive@rci.rutgers.edu

URL: mideast.rutgers.edu/islam-and-the-muslim-world

Announcement ID: 194590

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194590

image of books

Opportunities Digest (18 May 2012) – Scholarships, Conferences, Essay Prizes and more…

The Religious Studies Project Opportunities Digest

18 May 2012 Issue

image of booksWe are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources. If you have any content for future digests, please contact us via the various options on our ‘contact’ page.

In this issue:

 

  • Conference Announcements
  • Jobs
  • New Religion Database
  • Essay Prize
  • Scholarships
  • Calls for Papers
  • Public Lectures

 

 


CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS

 


 

Registration is now open for the 4th Exploring the Extraordinary conference, which will take place in York (UK) on the 21st-23rd September. Exploring the Extraordinary is an interdisciplinary network for those engaged/interested in research into the ‘extraordinary’ – topics often regarded as paranormal, supernatural, religious, transcendent, ecstatic, exceptional, mystical, anomalous, magical, or spiritual.

This year’s conference papers will include

*History, Spiritualism and psychical phenomena

*Parapsychological approaches to paranormal belief and experience

*Revenants in folklore and society

*Spiritual healing and landscape

*Magical performances, magical geographies

*Experiencing alternate realities and entity encounters

*Ghosts and place

*Music and the extraordinary

*Philosophy, the paranormal and questoning spiritual reality

*Extraordinary experiences, emotions and ethics.

For more information, please visit http://etenetwork.weebly.com/ or email ete.network@gmail.com

Exploring the Extraordinary is a not-for-profit researcher network run voluntarily, so we greatly appreciate any and all support.


‘Material Religion in Modern Britain and her Worlds’ June 8th and June 9th. University of Glamorgan Cardiff campus.

This two-day symposium will explore material cultures of religious belief and faith in modern Britain. As Birgit Meyer, David Morgan, Crispin Paine and S. Brent Plate have recently pointed out, studying material objects provides us with an alternative evidence base in the study of modern religious belief (Birgit Meyer et al; 2011). Yet few attempts have yet been made to do so. While many scholars now concede that Britain’s religious landscape is more varied and rich than the narrative of secularisation allows, a tendency remains in the historiography of religion to privilege written sources over material manifestations of religion. This means that all sorts of belief practices have been overlooked. Analysing the material past, we propose, will provide scholars with new and exciting ways of understanding the apparently fraught relationship between modernity and religion.

As Jane Bennett points out, objects are culture constructions and lead active lives in our social and cultural landscape. Religious historians have too often been guilty of adopting an implicitly Protestant binary (set up in opposition to Catholicism) in which words are privileged over objects. Yet everyday cultures of Protestant belief in Britain relied on all kinds of material cultures which sustained religion in an age of uncertainty.

Despite Britain’s ‘official’ Protestant past, we are nonetheless keen to encourage papers which explore religious denominations or groups beyond the official canon and which made up Britain’s multi-faith landscape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Papers are welcome which consider either formal or informal aspects of religious materiality. We would especially like to encourage papers that consider ‘Britain’s worlds’, including investigations of religious objects in the Empire or commonwealth or geographical locations inhabited by British people.

Conference Programme

Friday 8th June 2012

10.45

Conference Registration

11.30-1.00

Panel One: Past Visions

Eimir O’Brien, ‘Re-appropriating the Gothic: The Catholic Church and their Consolidation of Power in mid-Nineteenth Century Ireland’.

Timothy Carroll, An ancient modernity: Icons and the revitalisation of Britain’

Richard Irvine, ‘Counterfactual architecture: studies in ‘what if?’ from England and Gibraltar’

1.30-3.00

Panel two: Subjectivity, the everyday and material religion

Candace Hoffman-Hussain, ‘‘An exploration of religiosity and home artefacts within British interfaith hybrid coupledom’

Ann Wilson, ‘The material and visual culture of the construction of Irish Catholic identity, 1879 to 1922’’

Amy Whitehead, ‘An English shade of Animism: Contemporary statue devotion and the Glastonbury Goddess Temple’

3.30-4.30

Panel three: Senses and emotions

Julie-Marie Strange and Bertrand Taithe, ‘Compassion – The Stuff of Religion, 1870-1912’

James Mansell, ‘Church Bells and the Acoustic Experience of War in Britain, 1939-45’

4.30-5.30

Keynote Paper

John Harvey (Aberystwyth University) ‘Revival, Restoration, and Revision: An Audio Interrogation of Evan Roberts’ Wax Cylinder’

Saturday 9th June 2012

10.00-11.00

Keynote Paper:

Dominic Janes (Birkbeck College) ‘The Aesthetic Eucharist in Victorian Britain’

11.30-12.30

Panel Four: Church Exteriors and Interiors

Lucinda Matthews-Jones, ‘Sacred Art for the People: G. F. Watts’s Time, Death and Judgment as Material Christianity, 1883-1970’.

Jim Cheshire, ‘Fashioning Church Interiors – the Importance of Amateur Design’

1.00-2.30

Panel Five: Ritual and Material Religion

Kate Jordan and Ayla Lepine, ‘Adornment and Atonement: Textiles and Labour in Victorian Convents’

Jill Sudbury, ‘Skin as Spiritual Script: Tibetan Buddhism, Tattoos and the West’

Joe Webster, ‘Divine Paper, Demonic Plastic and Delicious Prawns: The Immanence of Transcendence in a Scottish Fishing Village’

2.30

Roundtable


Prophetic Arts in Africa, a Two Day Workshop in Lisbon 24-25th May, 2012

This is a two-day workshop organized by Julien Bonhomme (ENS) and Ramon Sarro (University of Lisbon) in Lisbon, as (hopefully) the first in a series of events we plan to organize around images, prophetic imagination, writing, memory and ritual. In this first one, we limit our focus to Africa.

The relationship between art and prophecy, complementary and alternative forms of imagination, is, intuitively speaking, obvious enough; yet there is still a lack of rigorous scientific research to be carried out about it. Many artists have been prophetic in their work, and many prophets have been artists in their ways of imagining the future and of translating this imagination into texts (sometimes even alphabets), drawings, houses or even cities. The interconnection between art and prophecy is an ideal place where to study the “work of the spirit” that Lévi-Strauss encouraged us to study, and the entanglement between, on the one hand, the domain of words and messages and, on the other, the domain of images and non-verbal connections. Our imaginative two-day journey will take us to Congo (a paradigmatic region of prophetic effervescence) the first day, and beyond Congo (West Africa and the Diaspora) the second day. Relying on the support of images (pictures, paintings, movies), we intend to comparatively analyze the connection between art and prophecy in Africa, in a workshop funded by the ANR Project “Création, Rituel, Mémoire” (Musée du quai Branly, Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale) and jointly co-organized by the musée du quai Branly, the Institute of Social Sciences (Lisbon), the École Normale Supérieur and the African Studies Centre of Lisbon.

Working language for the workshop will be French.

All welcome. oh, and we will also visualize Filip de Boeck’s film “Cemetery city”, which was not in our initial programme, but by coincidence was set for the 24 May on the programme of a parallel series of films on Africa. The film deals with death and religious imagination in Kinshasa and it speaks to many of the topics that will have been discussed in the earlier papers that day. Please note that unlike the workshop, the Film will be in English (some bits in Lingala, with subtitles in English).

NB this programme is still to be fully confirmed, there may be some minor adjustments in the final one. Please contact me if you intend to come and I’ll keep you up-to-dated.

Ramon Sarró, PhD (London), Habil. (Lisbon)

Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow

Institute of Social Sciences

University of Lisbon

Av. Professor Aníbal de Bettencourt, 9

1600-189 Lisbon

Portugal

e-Mail: ramonsarro@gmail.com


Magic is Might 2012: An International Academic Conference Exploring the Cultural Influences of the Harry Potter Books and Films

University of Limerick, Ireland

July 23-24 2012

Full Program now available: http://magicismight2012.blogspot.com/p/timetable.html

Registration now open! http://magicismight2012.eventbrite.com/?ebtv=C

The Harry Potter series has become a publishing phenomenon that has captured the imagination of children and adults all over the world. The stories created by J.K. Rowling have inspired extensive multidisciplinary academic discussion, ranging from cultural and literary analyses, sociological and philosophical interpretations, design practices, to recognised medical publications.

Conferences have taken place that focused on the impact that the novels have had on the world and their educational contribution and edited collections have been produced centering on themes of philosophy, religion, sociology, and critical analysis, to name just a few. The characters’ relationships, the political and social systems, and cultural commentaries woven into Rowling’s writing are just some examples of what makes the Harry Potter series an exciting framework for academic discourse in a number of areas.

This two-day event will feature twenty 15-20 minute presentations on papers relating to popular culture and the Harry Potter series. We will encourage intensive and lively discussion and debate around the papers over the two days in this intimate setting.

The conference will feature opening remarks by Dr. Eoin Devereux, author of “Understanding the Media”, Head of the UL Dept. of Sociology and a world-renowned expert on fandom, and a keynote presentation by Dom Mark Patrick Hederman, OSB, Abbott of Glenstal Abbey, lecturer and writer, on “Harry Potter” Archetype of the Child as our future in the 21st Century”.

Wizards, Muggles, established academics and postgraduate students are invited to join the conference!

Conference organisers:

Gráinne O’Brien (University of Limerick, Ireland)

Dr. Luigina Ciolfi (University of Limerick, Ireland)

Jadwiga O’Brien (National University of Galway, Ireland)

Lette Moloney (MoloneyMedia and Interaction Design Centre, UL)

Facebook page

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-is-Might-2012/115039398578113

To Register:

http://magicismight2012.eventbrite.com/?ebtv=C

Follow us on twitter @magicismight12

This conference is NOT authorized by J.K. Rowling, her US or UK publishers, WB,

Universal Studios or any other official Harry Potter related or trademarked entity.


Pagans in Dialogue with the Wider World: A Pagan Studies Symposium

Friday, February 15, 2013, San José State University

(semi-concurrent with PantheaCon, February 15-18, 2013, DoubleTree Hotel, San Jose, CA)

Sponsored by San José State University, Humanities Dept., Comparative Religious Studies Program

Organizers: Lee Gilmore (SJSU) & Amy Hale (St. Petersburg College)

Contemporary Paganism, in all its varieties, stands at a unique cultural and religious intersection that can provide insights for a wide range of global, social, and political subjects, beyond its own inward facing concerns. For this symposium, we are calling for scholarly submissions that focus on Paganism’s contributions to and engagements with broader cultural and religious dialogues in an increasingly pluralist world. These could include, but are not limited to, explorations of Paganisms’ endeavors in community, economic, media, health, legal, social justice, and institutional development work, as well as activist, applied, interdisciplinary, and interfaith work.

More generally, all submissions that critically examine Paganism(s) in relationship to categories such as religion, culture, gender, identity, authenticity, power, and ritual–among other possible frameworks–are welcome. In addition, all papers presented at the symposium will be considered for publication in a special issue of The Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies.

All proposals & queries should be sent to: pagansymposium@gmail.com

Deadline: September 15, 2012

More info (including submission requirements & a pdf of this call):

http://www.sjsu.edu/people/lee.gilmore/paganstudies/


JOBS


Dear Colleagues,

Attached please find an announcement for a professoral position in “Histoire des religions” at the University of Geneva (succession Philippe Borgeaud; annual gross salary starting from 164’500 CHF).

As chair of the nominating committee, I would be grateful if you could spread this information and encourage all potential candidates to apply.

I insist that although local candidates will apply, the examination process will be fair and open, and external applications will be assessed on the same footing as local ones.

Thank you very much for your help,

Best regards,

Nicolas Zufferey

Dean, Faculty of Humanities, University of Geneva


NEW RELIGION DATABASE


This is to announce the launch of a new cumulated International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) dataset with data from all three rounds of the ISSP religion survey (1991, 1998 and 2008). It covers 28 countries across the world, each of which has participated in at least two of the ISSP religion modules. Prior to this analysts have had to work with the three datasets separately.

Documentation and data access, including download in SPSS, SAS, or Stata format, is offered online via the GESIS ZACAT online analysis database at:

http://zacat.gesis.org/webview/index.jsp

This is the direct link to the cumulated ISSP religion file in ZACAT:

http://zacat.gesis.org/webview/index.jsp?object=http://zacat.gesis.org/obj/fStudy/ZA5070

And general information about ISSP can be found here:

http://www.issp.org/


ESSAY PRIZE


I am writing on behalf of the UK?s Science and Religion Forum http://www.srforum.org/ to publicise our 2012 essay competition. Please see above website for further information. The competition is open to all students (undergraduate and postgraduate) and the closing date is July 31st 2012.


SCHOLARSHIPS


Newman University College Birmingham, in conjunction with the Bible Society, is offering a full fees PhD Studentship from 1st October 2012 (or as soon as possible thereafter). The studentship is open to UK and EU applicants, and is available on either a part time or full time basis. It will cover all tuition fees for up to three years of study (full time) or up to six years (part time), subject to the successful applicant making satisfactory progress in their studies; if the student takes longer to complete the PhD, he/she will be liable to pay additional fees.

Applicants must have a good first degree (1st class or 2.1) in Theology, Biblical Studies, or a subject closely related to the research topic, and an MA or MTh or other relevant postgraduate degree. Applicants will need to demonstrate clear evidence of the skills necessary to undertake independent research (e.g. details of research methods modules undertaken and/or successful dissertations completed). Those who are invited for interview will be asked to supply in advance samples of their previous written work.

The successful candidate will be free to negotiate with the supervisory team a specific research focus within the general area of the Use of the Bible in Schools. Applicants should provide in the relevant section of the application form a draft research proposal outlining the aspect(s) of this subject which they are interested in studying, and this will form an important part of the selection process.

Newman University College has particular research strengths in the areas of Biblical Studies and Education, and our postgraduate students benefit from a high level of individual support and dedicated office space. For further information about the Institutional research environment or the Theology subject area and its staff, please visit our website:

http://www.newman.ac.uk/research/432

The application form is available from http://www.newman.ac.uk/studentships/867 and should be returned by post or e-mail to:

John Howard

Graduate School Administrator

Newman University College

Genners Lane

Bartley Green

Birmingham

B32 3NT

E-mail: john.howard@newman.ac.uk


CALLS FOR PAPERS


Religion and the Arts is planning a special issue on Opera and Religion for its issue 17.3 (published in June, 2013). Articles on all aspects of opera and all faith traditions will be considered. We prefer articles of between 4,000 and 9,000 words using parenthetical citation. Send complete articles to goizueta@bc.edu by October 1, 2012.

James Najarian, Editor


Call for Papers

for a special issue for the Journal of Muslims in Europe

“Europe with or without Muslims – narratives of Europe”

Guest editors:             Göran Larsson, University of Gothenburg

Riem Spielhaus, University of Copenhagen

We are seeking papers for a special issue of the new double blind-peer reviewed Journal on Muslims in Europe by BRILL to come out in Spring 2013. This special issue seeks to take up tensions in conflicting stories about and different perspectives on Europe’s history and identity that present Europe without Muslims or contrastingly portray Muslims as part of Europe’s past and present.

Under the headline “Europe with or without Muslims – narratives of Europe” we aim to bring together a number of perspectives from multiple disciplinary fields such as history, religious studies, cultural anthropology, political science and sociology in an analysis of diverging accounts and notions of Europe over time and places throughout the continent, open as well to external perspectives. The initial question thereby is, what role Islam and Muslims have played and still play in the imagining of what Europe means. (See more details on different possible themes for contributions below.)

This way we aim to direct our view at the nexus between constructions of Europe and developments within contemporary European Islam providing space both for a critical review of academic approaches and the development of new impulses for future research.

Besides empirical papers we strongly encourage theoretical papers that challenge current research on Islam and Muslims in Europe and reflect on the own position of the researchers and his or her contributions to the construction of Europe and the role and function of Islam and Muslims.

We invite papers that address one of the topics of two sessions described below. Deadline for sending your abstracts: July the 1st, 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>. Accepted participants will be notified by July 20, 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>. If your paper is accepted, you must submit the final paper (max 10,000 words inclusive of footnotes) by 20 October 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>.

Applications to submit a short paper should include: 1. Proposer’s name and affiliation, 2. a title for the paper, 3. a ca. 500 word abstract.

All abstracts and paper should be written in English.

Time frame:

Deadline for abstracts (ca. 500 words)                               1.July 2012

Deadline for sending final papers                                        20.October 2012

Publication                                                                           15.March 2013

Paper proposals should be send electronically in Microsoft Word formats to Göran Larsson, University of Gothenburg: goran.larsson@religion.gu.se<mailto:goran.larsson@religion.gu.se> and Riem Spielhaus, University of Copenhagen: rsp@teol.ku.dk<mailto:rsp@teol.ku.dk>.

For this special issue we invite papers on the narratives imagining Europe with and without Muslims analyzing contents, actors and setting of those narratives that relate to one or several of the following questions:

  1. Localizing debates connecting Europe and Islam:

•     In what way are debates about Europe and its identity mentioning the European past with reference to Muslim’s presence in Europe on the local, regional, national or European Union level? How do these different levels (local, regional, national, transnational) intersect?

  1. Imagining Europe without Muslims:

•    What are the main patterns of the dominant constructions of Europe’s heritage like notions of a Judaeo-Christian heritage? Where and by whom are these narratives told? To what extent are they embedded in European integration or projects of community or nation-building?

  1. Narratives of Europe inclusive of Muslims:

•    In what cases is the Muslim history of Europe used as counter narrative to question the construction of Europe as a Christian continent? What groups of people insist on an imagination of Europe with Muslims? How are these narratives used to strengthen a feeling of belonging and responsibility of current Muslims?

  1. Contextualizing Islam debates in European history of thought:

•    Is it possible to make any comparison between current debates about Islam and Muslims and previous debates about ties between religions and national identities e.g. different Christian denominations in early modern Europe?

  1. Imagining Europe from outside:

•    How is the relationship between Europe and its Muslim inhabitants viewed beyond the Mediterranean? Do accounts of European history and presentations of the contemporary Europe from within and without bear considerable differences?


Title: Special Issue on the Temples of Bengal

Date: 2012-05-30

Description: Special Issue on the Temples of Bengal We are happy

to announce that the next issue of Chitrolekha Magazine (Vol.

II, No. 1) is going to be on the Temples of Bengal (from the

Ancient Period to the 19th Century). Since we want to bring out

a collection having holistic approaches to the topics, we hav

Contact: editor@chitrolekha.com

URL: chitrolekha.com

Announcement ID: 194455

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194455


Title: Religions: Fields of research, methods and perspectives CFP

Date: 2012-06-15

Description: The First International Krakow Study of Religions

Symposium, 12-14 September 2012 Religions: Fields of research,

methods and perspectives Call for papers Keynote speakers:

Prof. Grace Davie (University of Exeter) Prof. Ralph W. Hood Jr

(University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) Prof. Barnaba Maj

(Univ …

Contact: bajka@iphils.uj.edu.pl

URL: www.religioznawstwo.uj.edu.pl/

Announcement ID: 194503

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194503


PUBLIC LECTURES


Irish Society for the Academic Study of Religions

PUBLIC LECTURE (all welcome)

Prof Tadhg Foley (Professor of Irish Studies, NUI Galway)

“Max Arthur Macauliffe and The Sikh Religion”

Date:  Friday 25 May 2012

Venue: Boole Lecture Theatre, University College Cork, Cork

Time: 5.15pm

Max Arthur Macauliffe (1838-1913), author of the monumental six-volume work, The Sikh Religion, began the preface to his magnum opus with the words: ‘I bring from the East what is practically an unknown religion’. Though regarded by Sikhs as perhaps the most important western figure in the history of their religion, Macauliffe himself is all but unknown in the west. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography does not notice him and he is unknown in his native country, Ireland. He was born as common or garden Michael McAuliffe in Monagea, Co. Limerick and educated at Queen’s College Galway, graduating in modern languages in 1860.  In 1862 he was appointed to the Indian Civil Service and was posted to the Punjab, becoming Deputy Commissioner in 1882 and two years later a Divisional Judge. Based in Amritsar, he developed an intense interest in the Sikh religion, producing the classic English translation of its holy book, the Granth, and, it seems, eventually converting to it. In 1893 he resigned from the Indian Civil Service to devote himself fully to the work of translation. In 1909, Oxford University Press published The Sikh Religion which incorporated his translation of the Granth. He died in London in 1913.

This paper will first address some inaccuracies in existing scholarship concerning Macauliffe’s date and place of birth and indeed the religion into which he was born. It will consider his conception of Sikhism, particularly in relation to Hinduism but also in the context of Christianity, both Protestant and Roman Catholic. He was also a reformer of the Sikh religion, being a leading member of Tat Khalsa, the radical section of the Singh Sabha reform movement, founded in Amritsar in 1873. But he saw his primary role as that of an evangelist for the Sikh religion in the west. He opposed ‘caste exclusiveness’ and ‘sati’, which he called the ‘concremation of widows’. He defended the translation of sacred scripture into vernacular languages and he saw himself as a pioneering figure in his systematic consultation with indigenous Sikh scholars. Indeed he saw his work as, in part, giving the permanency of writing to what had formerly been the orally transmitted wisdom of the gyanis. The paper will conclude with a discussion of Macauliffe’s views on how religion, especially Sikhism, should relate not only to the state as such but also to the British Empire.

The lecture will be followed by an informal Reception for all attending sponsored by the School of Asian Studies, Study of Religions Department and College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences, University College Cork (UCC).

Enquiries to Prof Brian Bocking, Study of Religions, UCC, email:  b.bocking[at]ucc.ie


Title: Religion in the Gallery: Two Talks and a Conversation,

Exhibiting Asia in the 21st Century

Location: District of Columbia

Date: 2012-05-24

Description: Join us at the Freer Gallery of Art on May 24, 2012

for two lectures on the role and use of religion in a gallery

setting, followed by an open discourse. Gregory Levine,

associate professor of Asian visual culture at the University

of California, Berkeley, will discuss Zen iconography from past

to p …

Contact: vaccaroj@si.edu

URL: www.asia.si.edu/events/exhibiting-asia/.

Announcement ID: 194447

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194447

Opportunities Digest (11 May 2012) – Conferences, Jobs, Degree Programmes and More…

11 May 2012 Issue

We are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources. If you have any content for future digests, please contact us via the various options on our ‘contact’ page.

In this issue:

  • Conference Announcements
  • Jobs
  • New Degree Programmes
  • Launch of the ‘Zaki Badawi Collection’ of Arabic books on Islam and the Middle East
  • Journals – advance notice
  • Call for Papers

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS


Apologies for cross posting

Registration is now open for the 4th Exploring the Extraordinary conference, which will take place in York (UK) on the 21st-23rd September. Exploring the Extraordinary is an interdisciplinary network  for those  engaged/interested in research into the ‘extraordinary’ – topics often regarded as paranormal, supernatural, religious, transcendent, ecstatic, exceptional, mystical, anomalous, magical, or spiritual.

This year’s conference papers will include

*History, Spiritualism and psychical phenomena

*Parapsychological approaches to paranormal belief and experience

*Revenants in folklore and society

*Spiritual healing and landscape

*Magical performances, magical geographies

*Experiencing alternate realities and entity encounters

*Ghosts and place

*Music and the extraordinary

*Philosophy, the paranormal and questoning spiritual reality

*Extraordinary experiences, emotions and ethics.

For more information, please visit http://etenetwork.weebly.com or email ete.network@gmail.com

Exploring the Extraordinary is a not-for-profit researcher network run voluntarily, so we greatly appreciate any and all support.


Title: The Land in Between  Three Centuries of Jewish migration

to, from and across Moravia, 1648-1948

Date: 2012-06-04

Description: CFP: “The Land in Between Three Centuries of Jewish

migration to, from and across Moravia, 1648-1948” (Olomouc,

Czech Republic, Nov. 18-20, 2012) Organized by the Kurt and

Ursula Schubert Center for Jewish Studies, Palacky University,

Olomouc, Czech Republic; and the Jewish Studies Program,

Central  …

Contact: hechtlouise@yahoo.com

URL: judaistika.cz/

Announcement ID: 194394

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=194394


Sufis and Scholars: The Development of Sufism in Britain

2 day conference to be held at Liverpool Hope University

25th and 26th May 2012

The conference will bring together a number of Sufi adherents and

scholars of Sufism to explore the development of Sufism in Britain.

Conference attendance is free but accommodation will need to be booked

in Liverpool.

Contact Ron Geaves, geavesr@hope.ac.uk or 0441 291 151 3036 to confirm

attendance.


JOBS


RELIGIOUS STUDIES AND THEOLOGY

Yale University – Librarian for Asian Christianity

<http://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=44542>


Please find details of a The Gladstone Post-Doctoral Fellow in Contextual Theology, UNIVERSITY OF CHESTER, below

( 1st October – 15th December 2012)

Work within a collegial department with a thriving research culture

Support and advice on publication from a mentor

Free accommodation, breakfast and an evening meal at Gladstone’s Library Hawarden

Office space at the University of Chester

Full access to the library resources at Gladstone’s and the University of Chester

Possibility of a small stipend to cover expenses

Opportunities for paid teaching

Background  Details:

Theology and Religious Studies at Chester is fast becoming one of the leading centres nationally and internationally for contextual, practical and public theologies. This Fellowship has emerged as a result of a partnership between the University of Chester and Gladstone’s Library, Hawarden. The successful Fellow will reside at Gladstone’s Library and have full access to their facilities while also working during the week at the University’s main campus in Chester.

The Fellow’s principal task will be to engage in research activities leading to one major publication and will receive support from the academic team at Chester in achieving that goal. For example, this may involve writing up your PhD for the purposes of publication or writing a journal article based on a new piece of research. The Fellow will also participate in the organization of a 24 hour conference at Gladstone’s Library in an aspect of contextual, practical or public theology (to be negotiated). Any other tasks will be negotiated with the successful candidate.

Applications are welcome from candidates who are within three years of completion of their doctorate. This will normally have been within any aspect of contextual theology (broadly defined), and your proposed research output(s) during the period of the Fellowship should also be in contextual theology. It is expected that the appointed Fellow will be in residence at Gladstone’s Library for the duration of the Fellowship.

Application Process:

Informal Enquiries to: Dr Wayne Morris: w.morris@chester.ac.uk

Applications should be sent by email to Dr Wayne Morris and include:

A full ‘Curriculum Vitae’

List of ‘Publications to Date’

A covering letter detailing how you will utilise the fellowship to develop a research publication (e.g. journal article, getting your PhD ready for publication)

The closing date for applications is 1st June 2012. Shortlisted candidates will be invited to interview which will take place at Chester before 1st July 2012.


NEW DEGREE PROGRAMMES


Registration for the four new Master programs in the study of religion at the University of Groningen is still possible for EU students until 15 May 2012. I would be grateful if you could forward this information to students who might be interested in the program, either in its one-year version or in its two-years version (Research Master).

The University of Groningen offers the following programs in the study of religion, all of them newly designed:

1. Religion, Conflict and Globalisation

2. Concealed Knowledge: Gnosticism, Esotericism and Mysticism

3. Origins of Abrahamic Religions: Texts and Contexts

4. Religion and the Public Domain


Zaki Badawi Collection


You are invited to attend the launch of the ‘Zaki Badawi Collection’ at the Boole Library, University College Cork, Ireland.

The late Dr Mohammed Zaki Badawi KBE as Chief Imam of the London Central Mosque and founder of the Muslim College in London made important contributions to the development of British and European Islam. In addition, he was a strong advocate and passionate practitioner of interfaith dialogue.

The substantial Arabic library of Dr Badawi has been given to the University College Cork Library on an indefinite loan. The acquisition of the ‘Zaki Badawi Collection’ provides Ireland with a unique research facility. The University College Cork Library now possesses the most comprehensive and extensive collection of Arabic books on Islam and the Middle East in Ireland to be used both by academic researchers and the public. The collection also provides an opportunity for researchers and the public to study the life and works of Dr Badawi and to honour his immense contributions to Islam in Britain and Europe as a whole.

The collection will be officially launched on 24 May 2012 at University College Cork, 6pm, Boole Lecture Theatre 2 (on main campus).

Prof Tariq Ramadan of Oxford University will give a lecture on Dr Badawi’s contribution to European Islam to launch the collection.


JOURNALS


 

Preternature Volume 3:1. The Early English Witch

The publication of early witchcraft texts created witches by creating controversy about them. Witch-dramas, pamphlets, testimonies about witch-encounters, sermons, and accounts of trials published the anxieties, recounted the long standing suspicions, and sensationalised the physical manifestations that made women into witches. Sometimes accompanied by woodcuts, many texts insisted on the reality, materiality, and immediacy of witches and their familiars. In these, the early modern witch was represented as both a perpetrator of violence and the victim of it. The early modern witch is a fascinating enigma: a legal entity and a neighbourhood resource or nuisance, she purportedly engaged in natural and supernatural forms of wisdom with the potential to heal or harm others, or even herself. The words she spoke, mumbled could become malefic by intent, if not by content. According to the sensationalist constructions of witchcraft, her body was contaminated by the magics she used: she fed familiars with blood, grew spare parts, could not weep, and would not sink. In accounts focused on bewitchment and possessions, the witch vomited pins or personified pollution and a culturally legitimate cunning-person such as a physician or minister or exorcist acted as curative. Despite the skepticism about witches that followed Reginald Scot’s assertions and the decline of legal examinations trials, the early modern witch has remained a vital force in the cultural imagination. Witchcraft remain the focus of academic articles, scholarly volumes, digital resources, archaeological digs, children’s and teenage fiction, popular media and museum studies.

This issue of Preternature, in association with the “Capturing Witches” conference, invites contributions from any discipline that highlight the cultural, literary, religious, or historical significance of the early modern witch. Contributions should be roughly 8,000 – 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus, and adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (style 1, employing endnotes). Contributions must be submitted through the Preternature CMS.

Queries about journal scope and submissions can be made to the Editor, Dr. Kirsten C. Uszkalo. Queries concerning books to be reviewed can be made to the Book Reviews Editor, Dr. Richard Raiswell. Queries concerning this special volume can be sent to Professor Alison Findlay and Dr. Liz Oakley-Brown

Full journal style guides are available at http://preternature.org. Information on the early English witch can be found at the WEME project at http://witching.org. Details on the “Capturing Witches

Preternature is a bi-annual publication, published through Penn State Press, and available in print or electronically through JSTOR, Project Muse, and as a Kindle e-book.


SCHOLARSHIPS


The Mohammed Arkoun Doctoral Scholarship

In recognition of the late Professor Mohammed Arkoun’s contribution to the the field of Islamic Studies and allied disciplines, the Institute of Ismaili Studies has established a new scholarship entitled “The Mohammed Arkoun Doctoral Scholarship”.

http://www.iis.ac.uk/view_article.asp?ContentID=113402

Mohammed Arkoun (1928-2010), originally from Algeria, was for many years Professor of History of Islamic Thought at the Sorbonne University in Paris. He was an original voice in this field, developing a critical approach to the history of Islam as well as contemporary evaluations of the field in both theological and academic writings on the subject. In particular, he advocated joint use of historical research and concepts from modern linguistics and social sciences with the aim of creating a new discipline of an anthropological history of Islam. He saw this as a further means to a unified science of religion embracing at least all faiths of ‘Mediterranean’ origin as well as modern secular ideologies, which in his view deserved an equally critical examination.

These ideas were disseminated through his many writings, lectures and informal addresses and communication. Mohammed Arkoun was also a keen contributor to practical projects aiming at cultural and intellectual inquiry about the Muslim world. Pre-eminent among these was the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. He also taught at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London, of which he was one of the Governors for many years, up to the time of his death.

The doctoral scholarship will be awarded once every four years for a four-year period to a graduate student pursuing research in the field of Islamic Studies, preferably in areas and on questions which are of importance to Professor Arkoun’s work. These include (but are not limited to):

-simultaneous attention to historical and modern issues in Islamic thought and society.

-harnessing the tools of the social sciences and humanities (notably, linguistics, sociology and anthropology) to the study of thought and culture in Muslim societies;

-consideration of theoretical frameworks for a critical understanding of religious thought and imaginaire in Muslims communities and other ‘Societies of the Book’.

This Scholarship will cover both tuition fees and personal expenses , up to the amount of GBP 25,000 per annum, for a maximum of 4 academic years.

Deadline for applications: 15 July 2012

Applications should be sent, in English, to Dr Omar Alí-de-Unzaga at scholarships@iis.ac.ukwith the following documentation in PDF format:

  • covering letter;

  • doctoral research proposal (maximum 2000 words);

  • applicant’s current CV;

  • a writing sample (between 10-25 pages)

  • letter of acceptance from the university where the applicant intends to study.

In addition, the applicant must arrange for three academic reference letters to be sent directly to the above address. Applicants who have already commenced their doctoral studies will be required to submit two academic reference letters AND a letter of good standing from the applicant’s principal academic supervisor.

INFORMATION ALSO AVAILABLE IN ARABIC, FRENCH, PERSIAN AND RUSSIAN AT www.iis.ac.uk


CALL FOR PAPERS


Call for Papers

for a special issue for the Journal of Muslims in Europe

“Europe with or without Muslims – narratives of Europe”

Guest editors:             Göran Larsson, University of Gothenburg

Riem Spielhaus, University of Copenhagen

We are seeking papers for a special issue of the new double blind-peer reviewed Journal on Muslims in Europe by BRILL to come out in Spring 2013. This special issue seeks to take up tensions in conflicting stories about and different perspectives on Europe’s history and identity that present Europe without Muslims or contrastingly portray Muslims as part of Europe’s past and present.

Under the headline “Europe with or without Muslims – narratives of Europe” we aim to bring together a number of perspectives from multiple disciplinary fields such as history, religious studies, cultural anthropology, political science and sociology in an analysis of diverging accounts and notions of Europe over time and places throughout the continent, open as well to external perspectives. The initial question thereby is, what role Islam and Muslims have played and still play in the imagining of what Europe means. (See more details on different possible themes for contributions below.)

This way we aim to direct our view at the nexus between constructions of Europe and developments within contemporary European Islam providing space both for a critical review of academic approaches and the development of new impulses for future research.

Besides empirical papers we strongly encourage theoretical papers that challenge current research on Islam and Muslims in Europe and reflect on the own position of the researchers and his or her contributions to the construction of Europe and the role and function of Islam and Muslims.

We invite papers that address one of the topics of two sessions described below. Deadline for sending your abstracts: July the 1st, 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>. Accepted participants will be notified by July 20, 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>. If your paper is accepted, you must submit the final paper (max 10,000 words inclusive of footnotes) by 20 October 2012<https://secure.mail.ibt.ku.dk/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>.

Applications to submit a short paper should include: 1. Proposer’s name and affiliation, 2. a title for the paper, 3. a ca. 500 word abstract.

All abstracts and paper should be written in English.

Time frame:

Deadline for abstracts (ca. 500 words)                               1.July 2012

Deadline for sending final papers                                        20.October 2012

Publication                                                                           15.March 2013

Paper proposals should be send electronically in Microsoft Word formats to Göran Larsson, University of Gothenburg: goran.larsson@religion.gu.se<mailto:goran.larsson@religion.gu.se> and Riem Spielhaus, University of Copenhagen: rsp@teol.ku.dk<mailto:rsp@teol.ku.dk>.

For this special issue we invite papers on the narratives imagining Europe with and without Muslims analyzing contents, actors and setting of those narratives that relate to one or several of the following questions:

  1. Localizing debates connecting Europe and Islam:

•     In what way are debates about Europe and its identity mentioning the European past with reference to Muslim’s presence in Europe on the local, regional, national or European Union level? How do these different levels (local, regional, national, transnational) intersect?

  1. Imagining Europe without Muslims:

•    What are the main patterns of the dominant constructions of Europe’s heritage like notions of a Judaeo-Christian heritage? Where and by whom are these narratives told? To what extent are they embedded in European integration or projects of community or nation-building?

  1. Narratives of Europe inclusive of Muslims:

•    In what cases is the Muslim history of Europe used as counter narrative to question the construction of Europe as a Christian continent? What groups of people insist on an imagination of Europe with Muslims? How are these narratives used to strengthen a feeling of belonging and responsibility of current Muslims?

  1. Contextualizing Islam debates in European history of thought:

•    Is it possible to make any comparison between current debates about Islam and Muslims and previous debates about ties between religions and national identities e.g. different Christian denominations in early modern Europe?

  1. Imagining Europe from outside:

•    How is the relationship between Europe and its Muslim inhabitants viewed beyond the Mediterranean? Do accounts of European history and presentations of the contemporary Europe from within and without bear considerable differences?

Opportunities Digest (4 May 2012) – Books, Conferences, Journals, Jobs and more…

4 May 2012 Issue

We are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources. If you have any content for future digests, please contact us via the various options on our ‘contact’ page.

In this issue:

  • New books
  • Conference Announcements
  • Journals – advance notice
  • Calls for Papers
  • Jobs

 


NEW BOOKS


If there is a new publication that we should share, please email us.

BENZAITEN GUIDEBOOK – Evolution of Benzaiten in Japanese Art and Lore

Date: Tue, 01 May 2012

Benzaiten Guidebook. 68 pages, 250 images.

http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/benzaiten.shtml

This illustrated guide traces the evolution of Benzaiten iconography in Japanese artwork and explores her role as a beacon of Japan’s combinatory Deva-Buddha-Kami religious matrix. To a lesser degree, it also examines the ritualistic context of her worship – how her art was employed in religious rites, state functions, Shintō ceremonies, and folk practices. It includes special sections on her Hindu associations, Kami associations, and Animal associations. It ends with

twelve mini case studies of her main sanctuaries in Japan, concluding remarks, and bibliography. Meticulously referenced. I hope it will augment the efforts of students, teachers, art historians, and scholars of Benzaiten art and lore for years to come.


CONFERENCES


Virtual Worlds Research Network – 16-18 May 2012, Edinburgh

The Virtual Worlds Research Network is a knowledge-sharing tool for virtual worlds researchers. The network features a mailing list and a website, and will officially launch with an inaugural conference at the University of Edinburgh, May 16-18, 2012.

Places are limited, so please register at www.vwrn.org


JOURNALS – ADVANCE NOTICE


Journal of Contemporary Religion, vol 27, no. 2 (May 2012)

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cjcr20/27/2


CALLs FOR PAPERS


Theme: Religion, Value, and a Secular Culture

Type: International Conference

Institution: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy (CRVP)

University of Kwazulu-Natal

Location: Durban (South Africa)

Date: 5.–6.11.2012

By the term “secular culture” is meant one which problematizes the foundations for the various religious beliefs that make up the traditions of that society, though the public order may not be

founded on any particular expression in those traditions, of the ethical framing of life together. The shift from a premodern culture is characterized by two central changes: (i) the greater degree of individual freedom. This is recognized as a key value in changing societies and is given expression in the democratic institution of universal suffrage; and (ii) the emergence and prestige of the sciences and of scientific method as the default paradigm of human knowledge.

As the major religious traditions acquired their canonical expression in premodern culture, they do not to any great extent deal with a thought-out response to the major factors or key values which characterize contemporary culture. Thus the first factor challenges the traditions to re-think attitudes to women, to moral rules and values, and to hierarchy; the second factor calls upon religious thinkers and leaders to be involved in dialogue with the sciences and knowledge acquired thereby.

One response to these changed conditions of society has been to remove religion and religious beliefs altogether from public debate. This is then framed solely in terms of individual human rights and the values of equality and tolerance. However, in the absence of any foundation for these rights and values, this framework might itself seem arbitrary and imposed, in particular in a global situation of the interaction of more developed with still developing cultures and economies. A purely procedural democracy and ethical framework might disallow real dialogue on substantive values or with persons.

Not amenable to scientific inquiry strictly speaking. Religious fundamentalism, for its part, sees no possibility of such dialogue, and can be seen, as does Karen Armstrong, rather as a reaction

thereto.

Papers are invited from any discipline whether philosophical, theological-religious, sociological, psychological, legal, political, and on any issue arising out of these intellectual challenges:

  • Developments within religious traditions in response to secularity

  • Conflicts and divisions within religious traditions in meeting the new conditions for religious beliefs

  • Differing political frameworks for regulating interaction between state and religion

  • Legal matters arising from separation of church and state

  • Religious traditions as challenging dominant models of secular ethics, in particular a possible bias towards individualism

  • The problems of building human community and countering fragmentation in conditions of a secular culture

  • Fundamentalism as response and resistance to secularity; recourse to violence

  • Secularisation in relation to neo-colonialism

  • Responses of particular countries in the face of secularism – South Africa, Turkey, United States, and others

  • Secularism depicted and problematized in fiction – Pamuk’s Snow, Dastgir’s A Small Fortune, for example

  • Secularism and particular religious traditions – Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, for example

  • Romantic love as a theme in religious responses to secular changes – Pamuk, Dastgir, Shutte’s Conversion, for example

  • Transcendence in a framework of immanence in the religious traditions

  • African traditional thought and response to secularism

  • Debates between science and religion – open and closed versions of neo-Darwinism

  • Studies of a contemporary writer on these theological themes: Karen Armstrong; Keith Ward; Mustafa Akyol; Mark Johnston; for example; or on the ethical themes: Alisdair MacIntyre, Herbert

McCabe, Marilynn Robinson, for example

  • Philosophical frameworks for fruitful dialogue between secular culture and religious traditions: B. Lonergan; Charles Taylor; and others

Contact:

Professor John Patrick Giddy

University of Kwazulu-Natal

Durban

South Africa

Email: Giddyj [at] ukzn.ac.za

Web: http://www.crvp.org/conf/2012/durban.htm


CFP: Journal of Anthropological Approaches to the Paranormal

Deadline of June 15th

Submissions can be blind peer-reviewed

Get in touch if you have an idea for an article you would like to submit, or would like to know more.

More details, and submission guidelines, are available here:

http://paranthropologyjournal.weebly.com/submit.html


Conference on Historiography of Religion

Senior and emerging researchers are invited to apply.

This conference is organised by the European Science Foundation (ESF) in partnership with Linköping University (LiU). The conference will take place on 10-14 September 2012 in Scandic Linköping Väst, Linköping, Sweden.

Submission Deadline: 14 May 2012

Grants for Young and Early Stage Researchers available.

Further information can be found below and at: www.esf.org/conferences/12386

<http://go.madmimi.com/redirects/1335952475-3227626606cae960e914f2f4a8e2f3d8-ae5c0b6?pa=9027561094>

Historiography of Religion

10-14 September 2012

Chaired by:

Jörg Rüpke – Max-Weber-Centre, University of Erfurt, DE

Susanne Rau – Department of History, University of Erfurt, DE

How to Participate*

Attendance is possible only after successful application. Application form is accessible from www.esf.org/conferences/12386

<http://go.madmimi.com/redirects/1335952475-3227626606cae960e914f2f4a8e2f3d8-ae5c0b6?pa=9027561094>

A certain number of grants are available for students and early stage researchers to cover the conference fee and possibly part of the travel costs.

Closing date for applications: 14 May 2012

Programme

The conference will focus on the question: How, under which conditions and with which consequences are religions historicized? The conference aims at furthering the study of religion as of historiography by analysing how religious groups (or their adversaries) employ historical

narratives in the construction of their identities or how such groups are invented by later historiography (comparative historiography). Thus the biases and elisions of current analytical and descriptive frames have to be analysed, too (history of research). Combing disciplinary

competences of Religious Studies and History of Religion, Confessional Theologies, History, History of Science, and Literary Studies, the participants will help to initiate a /comparative historiography of religion/ by applying literary comparison and historical contextualization to those texts that have been used as central documents for histories of individual religions and analyze their historiographic character, tools and strategies. Furthermore they will stimulate /the history of historical research on religion/; that is, identifying key steps in the early modern and modern history of research. The comparative approach will address Circum-Mediterranean and European as well as Asian religious traditions from the first millennium BCE to present. More

<http://go.madmimi.com/redirects/1335952475-99bdd547d43872eca842f4bf330b0f51-ae5c0b6?pa=9027561094>


Call for Papers

Alternative Salvations

University of Chester, 18th September 2012, 10:30-4:30

The Conference

To speak of salvation is, broadly, to speak about transformation from one present reality into a new, transformed and better reality. While the language of salvation itself is not necessarily found in every religious tradition, the hope of, or incentive to work towards, such transformation is a widespread characteristic of many religious traditions. In Christianity, there are a number of dominant perspectives on salvation associated with particular traditions, usually expressed in grand future eschatological narratives. But what of alternative approaches to salvation that have developed outside of established religious orthodoxies? The conference will explore how ‘unorthodox’ readings of sacred texts inform salvation experience; how life transformations outside of religious contexts might be considered spiritual; how  ideas of this-worldly salvation are politicised; how ideas of salvation are simultaneously secularised and infused with new power; what alternative salvations can be discovered within Christianity and how might they be practised. In particular, we are seeking to explore the ways that alternative religious, spiritual and secular understandings of the notion of salvation already shape, and have the potential to shape, how people live and act in Christian and post-Christian contexts.

Call for Papers

This exciting conference breaks new ground in exploring alternative approaches to salvation. Proposals for short papers are invited on any aspect of the theme of ‘alternative salvations’ as outlined here. Papers will normally be 20 minutes in length with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. Applications to submit a short paper should include:

·         Proposer’s name and affiliation

·         a title for the paper

·         a 200 word abstract

·         Details of any audio-visual equipment you will need to deliver your paper

Short paper proposals should be submitted to alternativesalvations@chester.ac.uk by no later than 4:00pm on 8th May 2012. Applicants should know the outcome of

their proposal by 18th May 2012.

Conference costs: £28 (£18 for unwaged and students) inclusive of lunch and refreshments.

More details about the conference and a booking form can be found at: http://www.chester.ac.uk/sites/files/chester/salvation%20conference.pdf


CALL FOR PUBLICATIONS

Theme: Globalization and Theories of Religion

Publication: Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory

Date: Special Issue

Deadline: 1.9.2012

In the past two decades the phrase “globalization” has been used increasingly and extensively to describe, characterize, or vilify the current state of world affairs. The expression early on had

primarily an economic, and to a certain extent a “neo-liberal”, set of connotations. But increasingly the word has come to be used to theorize a wide and diverse range of interrelated global trends, tendencies, and phenomena that are not only economic, but social, cultural, and political. The notion that specific religions, or religion as a whole, are becoming qualitatively different in this new “globalized” setting has been advanced by such well-known European

philosophers as Jacques Derrida, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Olivier Roy. Different conclusions have also been drawn by thinkers who represent the emerging world or the so-called “global south.”

This special issue of the Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory seeks article submissions that address the broader problem of globalization and religion. It also seeks shorter, critical, and

reflective essays (2000-4000 words) that deal with one or more of the following questions:

What do we really mean by the expression “globalization”?

  • How are the varied and complex theories of globalization affecting theories of religion as a whole?

  • In what ways have different world or indigenous religions become “globalized”? And what has been the short-term or long-term effect on them?

  • What is the shape of the emerging world order and how does it significantly challenge, or change, our understanding of the idea of “religion”, or the importance of religion, within the various disciplinary, subdisciplinary, and interdisciplinary matrices?

  • In what measures can and should theories of religion be integrated with current or prevailing theories of globalization (social, cultural, political, economic, social, etc.), and what priority should they be given?

  • How can the new forms of “political theology” be leveraged to illuminate and perhaps answer more discerningly many of the foregoing questions?

  • What insights do certain prominent and widely recognized philosophers and religious theorists or theorists – postmodern, postcolonial, “decolonial”, etc. – have to say, either explicitly or implicitly, about the question of globalization.

Deadline: September 1, 2012

Contact:

Carl Raschke

Email: carl.raschke [at] du.edu

Web:http://ww.jcrt.org


Call for Papers: Journal of Modern Jewish Studies Essay Prize 2013

Journal of Modern Jewish Studies are inviting submissions to their annual

essay prize for scholars in the early stages of their career. Papers are invited on

topics in Jewish history, social studies, religion, thought, literature and the arts from the 16th century to the present day. They should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and should not be submitted to any other journal until the outcome of the competition is known.

The Prize:

  • Cash prize of £150 GBP/$244 USD
  • Publication of the winning essay in Journal of Modern Jewish Studies as
  • the opening article of the July 2013 issue (volume 11, issue 2)
  • The winning essay will also be promoted on the journal website

For further information about the jury and the prize conditions, please click here.


PSYCHOANALYSIS, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

A POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE

CENTRE FOR PSYCHOANALYSIS, MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY, LONDON

We invite postgraduate students and research fellows to submit proposals for papers on

psychoanalysis or psychoanalytically informed research. Papers may be from any academic

discipline, including psychology, sociology, cultural studies, psychosocial studies, history,

literature, art, religious studies or philosophy. We also welcome proposals on clinical or

theoretical topics from students on psychoanalytic trainings.

This one-day conference is designed to give postgraduate students from all disciplines who

are interested in psychoanalysis an opportunity to present and discuss their research in an

informal and intellectually stimulating setting.

Abstracts of 300 words (maximum) should include a title, the name of your university or

training organisation and a telephone number. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes

long. A further 10 minutes will be allowed for discussion. Sessions of 1½ hours will have

space for three papers. There will be concurrent panels to accommodate as many papers as

possible. The day will end with a plenary.

The conference takes place at the Hendon Campus of Middlesex University (30 minutes from

central London) between 9:30 and 5:30 on Saturday, 9 June, 2012. Tea, coffee and a light

lunch will be provided. The conference fee is £40 for presenters and attendees.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is Friday, 18 May, 2012. Early submission and

registration is recommended. Abstracts and queries should be sent to: David Henderson,

d.henderson@mdx.ac.uk


The abstract registration for the conference  ENDS AND BEGINNINGS (EASR annual conference, IAHR special conference) that is to be held in Stockholm on August 23-26, will remain open until May 7th.

Please register your abstract to the conference on www.sh.se/easr2012


The Memphis Theological Seminary Journal is an online journal devoted to promoting public scholarship by combining the speed of journalism with the rigor of academic scholarship. Following this commitment, we invite substantive essays that examine all areas of religious studies. We especially welcome essays that contribute to theory, advance an understanding of an existing method or the development of new ones, extend or challenge a current paradigm, bridge a divide, clarify a term or concept, or examine practical and pragmatic applications of ministerial functions. The Journal welcome all types of essays—theoretical, historical, qualitative, quantitative, and rhetorical or a book review essay.

To facilitate double-blind peer review, manuscripts should be free of any material identifying the author(s) or their affiliation(s). Before submission, authors should be sure their manuscripts do not exceed 25 pages (including work cited page), are double-spaced throughout, and are saved in a standard word processor format (.doc, .docx, .wpd, or .rtf). Authors must ensure their accepted manuscripts conform to sixth edition of the Modern Language Association of Style and use inclusive language. Authors are responsible for acquiring any permission for the reproduction of texts, images, tables, illustrations, or other materials, as well as for providing camera-ready copies of tables, figures, and images.

All submissions are by email only and you may send them to: Andre E. Johnson, PhD at ajohnson@memphisseminary.edu

Please also include in the subject line: MTS Submission. For further information about the journal, please go to http://mtsjournal.memphisseminary.edu/


Jobs


please feel free to distribute the job announcement for the position of Director for the Donner Institute, Turku, Finland.

In Swedish:

http://web.abo.fi/instut/di/svenska/Befattningsberskrivning.htm

In English:

http://web.abo.fi/instut/di/english/Job%20description.htm

Weekly Opportunities Digest (6 April 2012) – Journals, Papers, Jobs and more….

Opportunities Digest – 6 April 2012

We have moved opportunities digests until Fridays, largely to promote more discussion related to the reponse essays and podcasts, and also to give readers the chance to think about the opportunities over the weekend. We are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources.

In this issue:

  • Advance Notice – Journals
  • Calls for Papers
  • Symposiums
  • Jobs
  • Studentships

ADVANCE NOTICE – JOURNALS

Religion, State and Societyhttp://www.tandfonline.com/toc/crss20/40/1

Journal of Religion in Japan, which is dedicated to Religion and the Secular in Japan, is now available. Brill is offering free online access to JRJ 1/1 at:

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/jrj/2012/00000001/00000001

Journal of the American Academy of Religion has just published a number of free articles on Buddhism http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/jaarel/bh.html


CALL FOR PAPERS

Pilgrimage and Sacred Places in Central and Eastern Europe: Place, Politics

and Religious Tourism

University of Zadar, Croatia

27-30 September 2012

We invite papers which will explore:

•                    Construction and deconstruction of sacred places

•                    Embodied spaces and body as a mediator

•                    Pilgrimage as a form of religious tourism

•                    Relationship between travel and tourism industry

•                    Pilgrimage and territorial boundaries

•                    Politics and Pilgrimage in the past and today

•                    Pilgrimage in memories and narratives

•                    Tourist ab/use of pilgrimage and sacred places

•                    Tourist perspectives on the pilgrimage journey

•                    Secular pilgrimage and tourism

•                    The realm of pilgrimage / tourism experience

Submission details:

Abstracts (up to 350-words in Word doc.), with contact details and affiliation, should be sent to the conference E-mail address (pilgrimageandsacred@gmail.com), or to Božena Krce Miočić (krceb@unizd.hr) or Mario Katić (makatic@unizd.hr) by 1th May 2012.

You will be informed about acceptance or non-acceptance of your proposal by

15th May 2012.

For further information: pilgrimageandsacred.info


International Conference on Religious Travel and Tourism in a Globalising World

27-28 April 2012, Nicosia, Cyprus

The University of Nicosia, the Euro-Mediterranean Academy of Tourism (EMAT), and the Cyprus Tourism Organization (CTO), welcome the submission of papers for an international conference, with the title:

GUIDING THE PILGRIM: RELIGIOUS TRAVEL AND TOURISM IN A GLOBALISING WORLD

The conference will explore such questions as:

  • How are religious and secular pilgrims guided to their destinations?
  • How are they guided around those destinations?
  • How are their expectations and experiences of those places shaped by the written and oral literature guiding them?
  • What is their role in shaping those texts and thereby the expectations of other visitors?
  • What is the role of tour guides, people, as well as oral and written texts, in shaping the experience of the journey and destination?
  • How is the identity of these travellers and local people influenced by this literature?
  • What role do these various texts play in helping people shift between secular and religious forms of pilgrimage?

For information concerning the programme, location, venue, registration fees, please visit:

http://www.emat.ac.cy/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=50:international-conference-on-religious-travel-and-tourism&catid=8

For online registration please follow the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dFdOVVVuZi1ibzRNejJZTUg1YWVkYUE6MQ#gid=0


CFP: Contemporary Islam: Dynamics of Muslim Life Call for Papers

Thematic issue: Muslims and ageing

The International referred journal Contemporary Islam: Dynamics of Muslim Life welcomes and encourages the submission of articles which reflect on ageing, perceptions of it and the impact that it has on Muslim communities both in Muslim majority countries as well as

Muslims living in the west.

Questions and topics for discussion include, but are not limited to:

  • The concept of ageing as discussed among Muslims

  • Ageing identity and self among Muslims communities

  • Challenges faced by Muslim communities as far as an increased ageing population

  • Changes in the care of the elderly among contemporary Muslim communities

  • Problems that elderly Muslims face in the West as far as care and support are concerned

  • Ageing and faith

  • Relations between the young and the old: inter-generational conflict, respect, and veneration

  • Political and social discrimination against  elderly Muslims.

The deadline for receipt of submissions is 31 July 2012

For this special issue, please direct all enquiries, requests for further information as well as actual manuscripts to our Assistant Editor: Ms Siobhan Irving   siobhan.irving@gmail.com

Some information about Contemporary Islam:

  • Contemporary Islam  has an acceptance rate of about 33% (applying to original research papers, so excluding book reviews and special issue papers)

  • Contemporary Islam has a very fast “time-to-first-decision” of 53 days on average despite submitting manuscripts to a very selective peer-review process  (2 or 3 peer-reviewers)

-Thousands of academic institutions worldwide now offer access to Contemporary Islam

For further information about the journal, including a description of the aims and scopes, please see:

http://www.springer.com/journal/11562


CFP: EASR 2012

23-26th of August, the EASR annual conferense 2012 – Ends and beginnings will take place at Södertörn University in Stockholm.  It is now possible to submit abstracts for the conference. Abstract submission deadline is 1 May 2012.

For more information, please see the conference web-site: http://www.sh.se/EASR2012


CFP: The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies http://www.transpersonalstudies.org/

is dedicated to theory, research, practice, and discourse in the area of transpersonal studies. Transpersonal studies may be generally described as a multidisciplinary movement concerned with the exploration of higher consciousness, expanded self/identity, spirituality, and human potential.

Now in its 31st year of publication, IJTS is published both online as an open access journal and in print (produced on demand through Lulu Press).

Current issue is available at:

http://www.transpersonalstudies.org/current_issue.html

Previous issues are available at:

http://www.transpersonalstudies.org/previous_issues.html

Call for Papers:

The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies plans to publish Special Topic sections on the following subject areas during 2012-2014:

  • Transpersonal Anthropology

  • Shamanism

  • Transpersonal Sociology

  • Expressive Art Therapies

  • Spiritually-Informed Social Activism.


SYMPOSIUMS

You are invited to a one-day symposium organised by the Society, Religion & Belief Research Group at the University of Derby:

RELIGION & BELIEF IN HIGHER EDUCATION

How are students and staff negotiating religion and belief in universities today? This symposium will bring together researchers examining the role of religion and belief in higher education and showcase a range of recent research projects. We will examine evidence from large-scale surveys and local case studies, and from projects spanning a range of faith and belief groups. Topics include multi-faith spaces on campus, non-religious students, Muslim chaplaincy and student Christianity. The symposium will bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, including sociology, religious studies, social policy, architecture, Islamic studies and theology.

SPEAKERS:

Professor Paul Weller & Nicki Moore (Derby) ‘Religion and Belief in Higher Education: Findings, Questions and Reflections from a Research Project for the Equality Challenge Unit’

Jacqueline Stevenson (Leeds Metropolitan) ‘Struggling, Striving, Strategising, Surviving: Religious students in UK higher education’

Dr Ataullah Siddiqui (Markfield Institute) ‘Bridging the Gap between the “Islamic Studies” and “Islamic Sciences”: Some Challenges’

Dr Mike Higton (Cambridge) ‘A Theology of Higher Education’

Dr Adam Dinham (Goldsmith’s) ‘An Ambiguous Role for Religion in the Universities: A Case Study in Practice’

Dr Andrew Crompton (Liverpool) ‘The Architecture of the Multifaith Space: Designing for Inclusion’

Dr Rebecca Catto & Dr Janet Eccles (Lancaster) ‘Forming and Expressing Non-Religious Beliefs in Higher Education’

Maulana Dr M. Mansur Ali (Cambridge Muslim College) ‘Muslim Chaplaincy in UK and US Higher Education: A Comparative Study’

Dr Kristin Aune (Derby) ‘Student Christianity in English Universities’

DATE: Friday 15th June 10am-4.45pm

VENUE: The Enterprise Centre, University of Derby, Bridge Street, DE1 3LA

REGISTRATION: No charge but places are limited so please register soon. Vegetarian lunch and refreshments provided.

Register by email to Frauke Uhlenbruch (f.uhlenbruch@derby.ac.uk) by Friday 18th May


JOBS

Lectureships in Sociology x2

University of Edinburgh

Closing Date: 24 April 2012

Further information: http://www.jobs.ed.ac.uk/vacancies/index.cfm?fuseaction=vacancies.detail&vacancy_ref=3015539


Loyola University New Orleans

Loyola University New Orleans seeks candidates for a tenure-track position in Islam at the level of Assistant Professor. The area of specialization is open. Expertise in Arabic and/or other relevant research languages is required. Deconstructing excellence in teaching

undergraduates will positively influence our deliberations. The successful candidate will teach general courses in Islam and an introductory course in world religions. The teaching load is 3 x 2 per year through the first six years. Complete dossiers should be received by April 13, 2012 to ensure full consideration. The successful candidate will support the mission of the university and the goals of Jesuit education. The search committee reserves the right to make a one-year visiting appointment in lieu of the position described above.

Loyola University New Orleans is a Jesuit and Catholic institution of higher education that prepares students to lead meaningful lives with and for others. The Department of Religious Studies offers two major tracks and supports numerous interdisciplinary minors across the

college and university. Loyola University, New Orleans is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Review of applications will begin in mid-April. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, three letters of reference and sample syllabi. Transcripts will only be requested of the finalists. Electronic submissions should be sent to: Dr. Timothy Cahill (tccahill@loyno.edu), Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Loyola University New Orleans.


STUDENTSHIPS

Two PhD-students Tilburg School of Catholic Theology 1,0 fte

Tilburg University (The Netherlands) is looking for two new enthusiastic and competent PhD-researchers, one PhD-researcher within the research programme “Christian Identity in a Pluralistic Context: Continuity and Discontinuity” and one within the Research Programme “(Re)actualizing Catholic Identity in Advanced Modernity”. More information on these research programmes and the participating members of the academic staff can be found online, on:http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/theology/programmes/

and underlying pages.

Your profile

For this position we seek candidates with a (research) master degree in Theology or a related field, a strong interest in doing research and excellent academic qualifications and writing skills. Developing and defending a project plan within the research programme will be part of the procedure.

Information and online application: http://erec.uvt.nl/vacancy?inc=UVT-EXT-2012-0124

Supervisor for candidates from sociology of religion, practical theology and religious studies:

dr. Kees de Groot

E: c.n.degroot@tilburguniversity.edu

W: www.tilburguniversity.edu/people/cdegroot

Homepage: www.cndegroot.nl

Twitter: @cndegroot

 

 

 

Weekly Opportunities Digest (March 23 2012) – Journals, Papers, Jobs, Fellowships and more…

Opportunities Digest – 20 March 2012

We have moved opportunities digests until Fridays, largely to promote more discussion related to the reponse essays and podcasts, and also to give readers the chance to think about the opportunities over the weekend. We have linked each heading below to the appropriate section so you can (hopefully) jump to whatever you are interested in. We are not responsible for any content contained herein, but have simply copied and pasted from a variety of sources.

Contained below:


Advanced Notice – Journals


Jobs


University of Oslo, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages – Associate

Professor, Religion in Modern China

A position of Associate Professor in Religion in Modern China is available at the Department

of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages from 1 January 2013.

Application deadline: 11 April 2012

Information and application: http://uio.easycruit.com/vacancy/663417/62042?iso=no


Michigan State University – Muslim Studies Program (Director)

Michigan State University (MSU), the nation’s premier land-grant university, seeks

applications for the position of Director of the Muslim Studies Program (MSP)who provides

leadership in shaping and implementing innovative initiatives to advance strategic

international research and engagement relating to the Muslim world. This search is

conducted in collaboration between MSU’s Office of International Studies and Programs

(ISP) and James Madison College (JMC), MSU’s undergraduate college of public affairs.

We seek candidates for appointment at the Associate Professor or Professor level to direct

MSU’s Muslim Studies Program and to teach and conduct research on the Muslim world,

with likely appointment in JMC’s International Relations or Comparative Cultures and Politics

programs.

Responsibilities: The MSP Director will provide intellectual and programmatic leadership to

advance and promote excellence in MSU’s diverse research, teaching, and outreach

activities relating to Muslim studies. This includes coordinating the Program’s activities and

representing MSP at MSU, across the nation, and around the world. As coordinator of MSP,

the Director develops and sustains strategic partnerships with higher education and other

institutions around the world to advance collaborative research, teaching, and engagement

activities relating to the Muslim world. that positively impact critical global issues and

transform the lives of people. The Director will have particular responsibility for overseeing

current and new partnership development initiatives in the Greater Middle East and Central,

South and Southeast Asia. The Director will facilitate and catalyze collaborative, multi-

disciplinary and cross-college faculty research with emphasis on priority research themes;

will build collaboration among social science/arts/humanities and STEM/health disciplines;

develop proposals for external funding for such research; and secure external funds for MSP

activities. Additional duties include advancing knowledge of Muslim studies; enhancing

instruction of relevant languages and course offerings with Muslim studies content;

overseeing the Muslim Studies undergraduate specialization program; and building and

strengthening relationships with diverse constituent and stakeholder groups such as faculty,

administrators, students, academic programs, K-12 institutions, local Muslim communities,

government and policy organizations, alumni, and others in the United States and in key

countries. In fulfillment of these duties, the Director will be required to periodically travel

internationally to develop and enhance MSU’s strategic partnerships and advocate for MSU

with relevant institutions in the Muslim world and elsewhere.The Director’s appointment will

be at least 50%, and up to 75% in MSP, with the exact percentages there and in an

academic department, the tenure home, to be mutually agreed among the successful

candidate, the Dean of ISP, and the Dean of MSU’s James Madison College. The

appointment will be on an annual (12-month) basis for a five-year period with renewal

possible. Salary and rank are commensurate with experience.

The Muslim Studies Program (MSP) is a cross-regional program that coordinates a large

and diverse set of educational offerings. Unlike Middle East Studies programs, MSP is

distinguished by the breadth of its geographical focus in the design of its curricula, foci of

faculty research, and scope of outreach activities.

In addition to research, MSP reflects the university’s overall commitment to

internationalization. The increase in international attention to the Muslim world and interest

from MSU students and faculty, and business and government in Michigan and the Midwest

have led to the development of a Muslim Studies curriculum aimed at meeting new needs

and advancing the genuinely multicultural quality of MSU. MSP also conducts extensive

outreach programs for K-16 educators, non-governmental organizations, governments, the

media, and business communities.

MSP is a unit of International Studies and Programs (ISP), and its Director reports to the ISP

Dean. ISP incorporates MSU’s extensive study abroad programs and international student

and scholar services. To pursue trans-regional and interdisciplinary strategic initiatives the

MSP actively partners with other ISP centers including: African Studies; Asian Studies;

Canadian Studies; Center for the Advanced Study of International Development; Center

for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; Center for Gender in Global Context; Center

for International Business Education and Research; Center for Language Education and

Research; and Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Other campus partners

include the Department of Linguistics and Germanic, Slavic, Asian, and African Languages

and the Institutes of International Agriculture, International Health, and International Studies

in Education, and International Business. MSP has more than 20 affiliated faculty members

in the humanities, social and natural sciences, agriculture, business, law, and other

professional programs who carry on research, and undergraduate and graduate teaching

related to the Muslim world. More information about MSP and its activities can be found at:

http://muslimstudies.isp.msu.edu/.

James Madison College offers a large and diverse program of international studies that

spans several undergraduate majors. Applicants should demonstrate excellence in

undergraduate teaching and a substantial record of scholarship. The successful candidate

will have great familiarity with Muslim issues worldwide with special expertise on the

Greater Middle East. The successful candidate may come from a wide variety of academic

disciplines consistent with the mission of the college, including political science, sociology,

anthropology, history, economics, area studies, international relations, and others, and will

specialize in one or more of the following areas: ethnic or religious conflict, political Islam,

culture and development, migration, and comparative and international politics of the Muslim

world. Expertise on the Greater Middle East is highly desirable.

James Madison College provides a liberal education in public affairs, combining the ethos

of a small liberal arts college with the advantages of a large, diverse university. The faculty’s

primary mission is excellence in undergraduate teaching, and the College is noted for its

rigorous academic standards and attention to the analytical, writing and speaking skills

of its students. In addition to the Muslim Studies specialization, the College is home to

specializations in Western European Studies, Political Economy, and Science, Technology,

the Environment and Public Policy. Through its faculty, the College has close working

relationships with Michigan State’s many international teaching and research centers. For

more information on the College, visit the JMC website at www.jmc.msu.edu.

Qualifications:

Candidates from all relevant academic disciplines will be considered, and are expected

to have an outstanding record of research and scholarship related to the Muslim world.

Experience working in, and expertise about, the Greater Middle East is desirable.

Candidates must have an earned Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree and must meet

the standards for appointment to the rank of associate or full professor (with tenure) in

James Madison College. Candidates are expected to have demonstrated leadership

and administrative skills, and abilities to secure external funding from diverse sources;

establish and sustain strategic partnerships with universities and other institutions in

key countries around the world; facilitate and catalyze programs of collaborative, multi-

disciplinary research on priority research topics; build collaboration among social science/

arts/humanities and STEM/health disciplines; and actively contribute to the ISP leadership

team. The position requires policy development and implementation capabilities, with the

ability to work collaboratively with faculty, administrators of academic units, and area studies

and international thematic centers in promoting international research, education, outreach,

and service programs. In addition, the ideal candidate will possess proficiency in at least one

language relevant to predominantly Muslim countries.

Candidates should go to www.jobs.msu.edu to apply for posting number 5949 in the Faculty/

Academic Staff postings. Submit a letter of application addressing your interest and how

your research and teaching interests would contribute to a college curriculum focused on

public affairs. The letter also should discuss your qualifications relevant to the position

description, and your vision for the position. Supporting materials should include a vita, three

references, evidence of quality teaching experience and commitment to undergraduate

teaching (including at least one syllabus), and a sample of scholarship (e.g., book chapter,

article, conference paper). For additional information about the University and its extensive

international commitments seewww.msu.edu, and www.msu.edu/international, and

www.isp.msu.edu. MSU is an affirmative action-equal opportunity employer.

Apply Here: http://www.Click2Apply.net/dmx34zq. The deadline for applications is March

25, 2012. Late applications will be accepted until filled.


The Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations (ALC), to be inaugurated at Seoul National University in March 2012, invites applications for a professorship (open rank) in Near and Middle Eastern studies from specialists in humanities (literature, history, or religion).  The candidate is expected to have an excellent command of Arabic and/or Persian and will be required to teach courses related to his/her research interests as well as advanced courses in reading texts in Arabic and/or Persian at both undergraduate and graduate levels.  Rank and salary will be commensurate with research and teaching credentials.  Only those who already have a PhD at the time of submission of application will be considered.  Send cover letter, curriculum vitae, graduate transcript, statement of research, statement of teaching philosophy (including description of courses that the applicant can teach), and three letters of recommendation (directly from the referees) as well as any inquiry to:

Professor Juhyung Rhi

Chair, ALC Search Committee

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

College of Humanities

Seoul National University

Seoul 151-745

S. Korea

Email: jhrhi@snu.ac.kr (Email submission is allowed.)

Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. For full consideration, complete applications should be received by April 1, 2012. Early submission of CV will be appreciated.


Lecturer in the Study of Religion

Department of Theology and Religion, Durham University

Salary: £30,122 to £44,166 per annum dependent upon experience

Grade: Grade 7/8

Contract: Non fixed-term, full-time

Hours: Nominally 35 hours per week

Details: Full details of the post are available on the university website at www.durham.ac.uk/jobs/

Deadline for applications: 2nd April 2012 (midnight)

The Department of Theology and Religion at Durham University has a long-standing tradition of outstanding research and is widely recognized as one of the leading departments in its field. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise it was ranked first in the UK, while its teaching quality is shown in its consistently obtaining exceptionally high rankings in both National Student Surveys and independent league tables. Its strengths range across Biblical Studies (Old Testament, New Testament, ancient Judaism, and Biblical languages), Christian theology (Greek and Latin patristics, the history and theology of late antiquity and the early middle ages, the Reformation, doctrinal and philosophical theology, and theological ethics), and the Study of Religion (the anthropology, sociology and psychology of religion). It also has Centres in Catholic Studies and in Death and Life Studies, and research projects in Spirituality, Theology and Health, and Faith and Globalization. The Department has a welcoming and collegial atmosphere, and is beautifully sited between the Cathedral and the Castle on the World Heritage Site in the centre of the city of Durham.

This new post welcomes applicants from those with research expertise in any area of the social scientific study of religion, a developing field flourishing within the Department. Current teachers in this area include Professor Douglas Davies, specializing in the anthropology of religion, particularly Mormonism, Death Studies, Ritual-Symbolism, Emotion and Embodiment, and the contemporary Anglican church; Dr Mathew Guest, specializing in the sociology of religion, particularly evangelical Christianity, religion in universities and religion and generational change; and Dr Charlotte Hardman, specializing in the anthropology of religion, particularly shamanism. Staff in this area have a proven track record in externally funded research projects, including recent research into ‘Christianity and the University Experience’, ‘Cremation in Scotland’, ‘Woodland Burial’, ‘Religion, Identity and Emotion’ and ‘the Clergy and British Society’. Several other departmental staff have ongoing cross-disciplinary research interests that relate to the study of religion. There is a fortnightly research seminar in Religion and Society, at which papers are presented by leading scholars from the UK and abroad as well as by members of staff and research postgraduates. More information about the Department is available at http://www.dur.ac.uk/theology.religion/.

The successful applicant will be expected to teach and collaborate in modules in the Study of Religion at undergraduate and taught postgraduate levels, to supervise postgraduate research, to undertake outstanding research leading to publications of international significance, and to play a full part in the life of the department.

Job Description

The postholder will be responsible to the Head of Department, currently Dr Robert Song.

Job Summary and Purpose:

The main features of the job will be:

a) to conduct outstanding research leading to publications of international significance in the field of the Study of Religion;

b) to teach at all undergraduate levels and at Masters level in the field of the Study of Religion;

c) to attract and supervise research students (MA and PhD) in the Study of Religion;

d) to submit applications for externally-funded research grants;

e) to undertake administrative tasks in the Department of Theology and Religion, as agreed with the Head of Department.

Key Responsibilities:

The key responsibilities of the job will be in teaching (lecturing, seminar leading, course organisation, marking, and dissertation supervision) at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, research (writing and publication), and administration, within the team of staff constituting the Department of Theology and Religion.

For appointment at Grade 8, candidates will need to provide evidence of relevant teaching and supervising experience at university level and a significant record of publications at international level.

Contact

Dr Robert Song, Head of Department, +44 (0)191 334 3959, robert.song@durham.ac.uk.


Calls For Papers


Call for Papers| 4-6 July 2012, Goldsmiths, University of London

Nonreligion and the Secular: New Horizons for Multidisciplinary Research

Sponsored by the Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN)

Conveners: Lois Lee (ll317@cam.ac.uk), Stacey Gutkowski (stacey.gutkowski@kcl.ac.uk), and Stephen Bullivant (stephen.bullivant@smuc.ac.uk)

Conference Coordinator: Katie Aston (k.aston@gold.ac.uk)

Following decades of neglect, the academic study of nonreligion has grown rapidly in the past five years.  The primary aim of this conference is to bring together scholars across a range of academic disciplines (sociology, anthropology, theology, political science, psychology, history, international relations, area studies) to begin to untangle the confused and individually contested concepts of nonreligion and the secular. Is nonreligion a subcategory of the secular or vice versa? How do the two terms structure one another? What are the practical and theoretical implications of the concepts, such as they are and/or in alternative formulations? The aim of this international conference is to contribute to addressing this lacuna. . While discussions of nonreligion and the secular have been running largely in parallel, they are potentially mutually enriching topics with significant bearing outside of the academy. This conference will consolidate the achievements already made over the past five years by nonreligion scholars and forge new, multidisciplinary dialogue between these researchers and those primarily working with the concept of the secular. This conference will bring together a range of internationally renowned scholars, including keynote speakers Gracie Davie (Exeter), Callum Brown (Dundee), Monika Wohlrab-Sahr (Leipzig), and Humeira Iqtidar (King’s College London).

The conference engages with a historical moment in which forms of religion and nonreligion have increasingly asserted themselves in the public sphere, in non-Western as well as Western settings. In the case of radical Islamism and New Atheism, such assertions have had powerful, sometimes inflammatory and divisive affect. This urgent wider social and political context demonstrates the urgency of a reasoned, global, scholarly contribution, aimed at further theorising and conceptualising nonreligion and the secular, individually and in relation to each other.

This conference will interrogate three dimensions and welcomes both empirically- and theoretically-based paper contributions which address the following:

1) Nonreligion as a concept in its own right

What is meant by the term “nonreligion”? How does it manifest itself in the lives of individuals and in collective social activity and identity? Is it the most appropriate term to encompass a range of phenomena and where may its parameters lie? What is the relationship between nonreligion and modernity? Is nonreligion a resonant category outside of Western contexts?

2) The nonreligious in relation to notions of the secular

How do nonreligion and the secular mutually constitute one another? Under what historical social and political conditions did the rise of secularism and secularity facilitate the appearance of the nonreligious? Does the emergence of the nonreligious indicate a new phase of modernity?

3) The implications of nonreligion research for pressing social and political issues associated with discussions of the secular

What bearing does nonreligiosity have on social, political and legal questions about social cohesion and multiculturalism? To what extent do the “harder” forms on nonreligion breed intolerance and fundamentalism? What are the implications of nonreligion for the possibility of democratic consensus and governance? To what extent do secular political landscapes outside of the West involve or even require the presence of nonreligious phenomena?

Publication Outcome: We are planning to publish a selection of the papers presented at the conference in an edited volume.

The deadline for abstract submission (250 words max) is 27 April 2012. Please send your abstract together with a short biographical note to Katie Aston at k.aston@gold.ac.uk


SAAG (South Asia Anthropologists Group) 2012

This year SAAG will be held in Edinburgh on 4th, 5th and 6th September (4th 5th and 6th half

day).

As usual, we welcome paper proposals from those at any stages of their academic careers,

from first year PhD students onwards. In order to be able to cover our food costs, lunch on

the 5th and 6th, and tea and coffee, there will be a fee of £15 for the whole workshop. We

also hope to cover the costs of a conference dinner on one evening.

If you are interested to attend, submit a paper, or act as a discussant for SAAG 2012, please

contact one of the organising committee members Stewart Allen, Supurna Banerjee, Feyza

Bhatti or Ruth Marsden) at 2012saag@gmail.com. If you would like to offer a paper for

discussion, please send a title and brief abstract by April 30th 2012.


Transformations of the Sacred in Europe and Beyond

ESA Mid-term Conference: Research Network 34 – Sociology of Religion

University of Potsdam, Germany, 3-5 September 2012

in cooperation with the German Section for the Sociology of Religonin the DGS

You will find the registration form on: http://www.esareligion.org/bi-annual-conference/


The International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture (http://www.religionandnature.com/society/) (ISSRNC) is pleased to announce

its next conference in Malibu, California at Pepperdine University on August

8-11, 2012. The conference theme will be “Nature and the Popular

Imagination.”

For generations, the interconnections between religion and nature have been

expressed, promoted, and contested through the incubator of popular culture,

including films produced in nearby Hollywood. As a global and symbolic center

that reflects and invents nature/religion representations, Malibu and its environs

provide a fantastic venue for critical reflection on the religion/nature nexus in the

popular imagination. Along with keynote addresses and other scholarly sessions,

a number of special events and excursions are in the works, including a scholar-

led tour of The Getty Villa in Malibu and opportunities to enjoy the beautiful and

famous Malibu coast. Some of these may be offered before or after the official

conference period. Affordable on-campus housing will be available to conference

participants.

We invite proposals about nature and religion in diverse expressions of popular

culture, including films, television, comics, fiction, music, sports, graffiti,

clothing, and festivals. As always, while we encourage proposals focused on

the conference’s theme, we welcome proposals from all areas (regional and

historical) and from all disciplinary perspectives that explore the complex

relationships between religious beliefs and practices (however defined and

understood), cultural traditions and productions, and the earth’s diverse

ecological systems. We encourage proposals that include theoretical frameworks

and analyses, emphasize dialogue and discussion, promote collaborative

research, and are unusual in terms of format and structure.

Proposals for individual paper presentations, sessions, panels, and posters should

be submitted directly to Sarah Pike at spike@csuchico.edu. It is not necessary

to be an ISSRNC member to submit a proposal. Individual paper proposals

should include, in a single, attached word or rich text document, the name and

email of the presenter(s), title, a 250-300 word abstract, and a brief, 150 word

biography (including highest degree earned and current institutional affiliation,

if any). Proposals for entire sessions must include a title and abstract for

the session as a whole as well as for each individual paper. Proposers should also

provide information about ideal and acceptable lengths for proposed sessions,

and whether any technology, such as data projectors, are desired. Most paper

presentations will be scheduled at 15-20 minutes and a premium will be placed

on discussion in all sessions. Proposals will be evaluated anonymously by the

Scientific Committee, but conference directors will be aware of proposers’

identities in order to select for diversity in terms of geographical area and career

stage. Student proposals are particularly welcome.

The deadline for proposals is 1 May 2012.

For more information and updates, please go to: http://www.religionandnature.com/society/conferences.htm#malibu


Exploring the Extraordinary 4th Conference, 22nd-23rd September, 2012

Holiday Inn, York

Since its inception in 2007, members of Exploring the Extraordinary have organised three successful academic conferences that have brought together researchers from a variety of different disciplines and backgrounds. The purpose of these events has been to encourage a wider dissemination of knowledge and research, and an interdisciplinary discussion of extraordinary phenomena and experience. By ‘extraordinary’ we refer to phenomena and experiences that are considered to be beyond the mundane, referring to those that have been called supernatural, paranormal, mystical, transcendent, exceptional, spiritual, magical and/or religious, as well as the relevance of such for human culture.

We are looking for submissions for our fourth conference, and would like to invite presentation proposals on topics related to the above. Please submit a 300-500 word paper abstract to Dr Madeleine Castro and Dr Hannah Gilbert (ete.network@gmail.com) by the 6th April 2012. Accepted papers should be on powerpoint, no longer than 20 minutes in length, and intended for an interdisciplinary audience. Please include contact information and a brief biographical note.

For more information, and to see past conference schedules, please visit http://etenetwork.weebly.com


Regarding the Other in Modern Jewish Thought. A CJCR Colloquium – 27 June 2012

The Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations (Woolf Institute, Cambridge) is delighted to announce that it is hosting a colloquium, Regarding the Other in Modern Jewish Thought. The

colloquium will be held on Wednesday, 27 June 2012 and take place at Lucy Cavendish College (Cambridge).

Speakers:

  • CJCR Visiting Fellow, Aaron Rosen (KCL)
  • Agata Bielik-Robson (Nottingham)
  • Melissa Raphael (Gloucestershire).

Full details of the colloquium, together with the registration form, can be found at

http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/events/details?year=2012&month=6&day=27#ID449.

Bursaries are available for graduate students.


Death in modern Scotland, 1855-1955: beliefs, attitudes and practices

New College, University of Edinburgh, Friday 1 February 2013 – Saturday 3 February, 2013.

‘There remains a huge agenda for death research, offering a unique vantage point for the study of Scottish history’ (Professor Elaine McFarland of Glasgow Metropolitan University, 2004). Since those words were written, there have been increasing signs of interest, research and publications in death studies in Scotland.

This conference invites those who are researching death from whatever disciplinary perspective to offer papers whose total range will illuminate one hundred years of death in modern Scotland. These hundred years began with the passing of the Registration Act and the Burial Grounds (Scotland) Act in 1855 and end with the opening of Daldowie Crematorium in 1955.

Plenary speakers include:

Professor Elaine McFarland, Dr Elizabeth Cumming and Professor Hilary J. Grainger.

Papers will be particularly welcome on the subjects of:

death, grief and mourning;

funeral rites and rituals; customs and costume;

demographic and statistical interpretations; registration of death;

public health and medicine;

death, poverty, gender and social class

death, urban and rural comparisons

burial and cremation;

the development of funeral directing services;

theology, liturgy and funeral ministry;

monuments and memorialisation;

issues of architecture and landscape design;

the folklore of death; ghost narratives and beliefs; spiritualism;

death in war-time;

death, grief, mourning;

death in literature and the arts;

death and Scottish law;

violent death; the death penalty;

disasters: air, rail, sea and industrial;

Established research and work-in-progress welcomed.

 

Abstracts of 200 words maximum may be sent to Peter C. Jupp, Braddan House, High Street, Duddington, Stamford, Lincs PE9 3QE email peterc.jupp@btinternet.com or peter.c.jupp@ed.ac.uk

A follow-up call for papers with full conference details and names of plenary speakers will be published soon.

Conference Committee: the Revd Dr Peter C. Jupp (Department of Divinity, University of Edinburgh, Chair); Dr Marion Bowman (Chair, Religion Department, Open University), Dr Susan Buckham (Independent Researcher; Kirkyard Consulting), Ms Nicola Davidson (Divinity Department, University of Edinburgh); Dr Ronnie Scott (Glasgow).


Gaia Gathering: Canadian National Pagan Conference, Toronto, May 18 – 21, 2012

Theme: Building the Mosaic

Gaia Gathering was founded in 2004 and had its first conference in 2005. Each year the conference is hosted over the Victoria Day long weekend in a different Canadian city through a bidding process similar to the Olympics. Past host cities include Edmonton, Halifax, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Vancouver and Montreal. Legally, we are incorporated federally as a non-profit

organization and operate with a national Board of Directors as well as a local host committee.

The conference is organized collaboratively by Canadian Pagans and includes four days of discussion and workshops about Canadian Paganisms. After seven years of traveling across the country, the conference this year will be held in Toronto, Ontario at the University of Toronto New College. The theme for 2012 will be “Building the Mosaic”. Individuals make up the whole of a community. By bringing together pieces of respective Pagan communities and local groups during the conference, a representation of the larger Canadian Pagan Mosaic emerges.

In keeping with the theme “Mosaic”, we have chosen to present a “Mosaic of Speakers” representing the rich diversity of Canadian Paganism: Andy Biggers (Simcoe County, ON) has been deeply involved in the North American pagan and heathen community for over 25 years.

Michel & Pamela Daw (Gatineau, QC) are modern Stoics, reviving the ancient philosophical and spiritual path. Tamara James (Toronto, ON) is a founding member of the Wiccan Church of

Canada, which was established in 1979, and was one of the first Pagan clergy to serve in a Canadian prison system. Sydney Lancaster (Edmonton, AB) is a visual artist, writer, musician, Artist in Residence at Harcourt House, and an OBOD ovate. Brian Walsh (Toronto, ON) is a permanent part-time Spiritual Care Provider at a major Toronto hospital and a part-time Clinical Fellow in Spiritual Care at another major Toronto hospital. Witchdoctor Utu (St. Catharines, ON) is the founder of the Niagara Voodoo Shrine, the world-renowned Dragon Ritual Drummers and is a member of the New Orleans Voodoo Spiritual Temple. The complete bios for our invited guests can be found on our website.

In addition to the speakers we will also feature workshops, panel discussions, academic presentations and evening entertainment throughout the weekend.

SUBMISSION CRITERIA

We invite papers and proposals for our academic stream from all faculties within the humanities who touch into the realm of alternate spirituality, Paganism, New Religious Movements and related subjects. Also, if you are a retired, solitary, armchair, or aspiring academic not affiliated with an institution then you may also submit by the same criteria and to the same locations. We hope to see everyone rise to the challenge and welcome them to this opportunity to present here in Montreal with like-minded individuals.

Submissions may be sent via mail or e-mail and are to be no more than one page. They must include a publication-ready, titled abstract of 150-200 words. The name, address, telephone numbers, e-mail address, college or university affiliation and level of study of the presenter(s) must also be included. Any special requests or needs for audio-visual equipment must also

be indicated. We will be accepting submissions for peer and academic review between February 2nd and March 20th (Ostara 2012). Abstracts and proposals (and thus presentations) may be in English or in French. All received submissions will be acknowledged, with notification of acceptance, by early April 2012.

Email to: bmyers@cegep-heritage.qc.ca

Or mail to:

Dr. Brendan Myers

C/O Cegep Heritage College

325 boul. Cite-des-Jeunes,

Gatineau Quebec

J8Y 6T3


Material Religion in Modern Britain and her Worlds

8-9 June 2012, University of Glamorgan, Cardiff

This two-day symposium will explore material cultures of religious belief and faith in modern Britain. As Birgit Meyer, David Morgan, Crispin Paine and S. Brent Plate have recently pointed out, studying material objects provides us with an alternative evidence base in the study of modern religious belief (Birgit Meyer et al; 2011). Yet few attempts have yet been made to do so. While many scholars now concede that Britain’s religious landscape is more varied and rich than the narrative of secularisation allows, a tendency remains in the historiography of religion to privilege written sources over material manifestations of religion. This means that all sorts of belief practices have been overlooked. Analysing the material past, we propose, will provide scholars with new and exciting ways of understanding the apparently fraught relationship between modernity and religion. As Jane Bennett points out, objects are culture constructions and lead active lives in our social and cultural landscape. Religious historians have too often been guilty of adopting an implicitly Protestant binary (set up in opposition to Catholicism) in which words are privileged over objects. Yet everyday cultures of Protestant belief in Britain relied on all kinds of material cultures which sustained religion in an age of uncertainty.

Despite Britain’s ‘official’ Protestant past, we are nonetheless keen to encourage papers which explore religious denominations or groups beyond the official cannon and which made up Britain’s multi-faith landscape in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Papers are welcome which consider either formal or informal aspects of religious materiality. We would especially like to encourage papers that consider ‘Britain’s worlds’, including investigations of religious objects in the Empire or commonwealth or geographical locations inhabited by British people.

 

We hope to encourage an interdisciplinary dialogue by bringing together scholars in history, religion, art/design history, architecture and sociology.

Keynote speakers to be annouced

 

Possible themes or topics include:

  • Religious objects

  • Religious ephemera

  • The materiality of religious and sacred texts
  • Sacred Dress and Clothing
  • Religious Architecture and the built environment
  • Construction of sacred space
  • Social identity/identities including class, gender and life stage
  • Ideas surrounding materiality and religion
  • Advertising and Consumption
  • Making of religious objects
  • Religious Interiors and the domestic display of material objects

  • Religious aestheticism
  • Iconography

Please send abstracts of 400 words either Lucinda Matthews-Jones [l.matthew-jones@ljmu.ac.uk] or Tim Jones [twjones@glam.ac.uk] by 31st March. The Conference will be hosted by the University of Glamorgan, Cardiff Campus. We plan a number of publication outputs from this conference. If you are unable to attend, but would like to express your interest for future events or outputs, please email Lucinda Matthews-Jones [l.matthew-jones@ljmu.ac.uk] with a brief description of your work and a short CV.


Calls for Chapters


Call for submissions to Handbook on African American Islam – Aminah Beverly

McCloud

According to the Gallup Poll (2009), African American Muslims comprise the largest ethnic

group of Muslims in the United States at 35%, as well as the oldest. There are communities

of African American Muslims across the United States, from large metropolitan areas such

as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Atlanta, to small town communities in Kentucky

and Tennessee. There is a wide range of economic diversity as there is a wide range of

social class represented. Many families have produced three generations of Muslims who

cling to the religion while living in an increasingly secular America. They too, are weathering

the onslaught of Islamophobia and the pervasive fear and sometimes hate filled rhetoric of

newscasters and other media pundits. There will be several contributors writing chapters

devoted to their maturity as Muslims living in America, their contributions to their homeland’s

religious landscape and their interactions with other Muslim and non-Muslim American

communities.

The goal of this effort is to publish an accessible and authoritative source for students of

religious studies, American religions, African American religions, anthropology, Muslim

cultures, and Islam in America. It will investigate the ongoing phenomenon of African

American Islam as a religious culture in the American landscape. It will also provide case

studies for those interested in Muslim cultural history. This handbook will be a compilation

of various disciplinary approaches to the study of religion and religious communities. The

handbook will be handy history text in its characterization of African American Islam as a

long-term presence in the United States that had its beginnings in American chattel slavery.

With this in mind, I am soliciting chapters on:

  1. The various communities that claim Islam – Particular communities such as the NOI,

Moorish Science Temple, Nation of Islam, Sufi Communities, Darul Islam, communities of

Warithudeen Muhammad, Shia communities, etc. Articles can be historical but must include

current research.

  1. Identity. Almost all members of the African American Muslim community speak of themselves in ways most commonly referred to as ‘disapora.’ Whether seeing themselves

as ‘Muslims who live in America’ or Asiatics or Ethiopians; the notion of diaspora is

prevalent. How do African American Muslims imagine themselves? Are there competing

definitions of diaspora? What are the meanings of African and American in current Islamic

thinking? How do African American women negotiate their Muslimness?

  1. How have African American Muslim communities developed as Islamic communities?

What are the varieties of the Islamic experience? Who is Muslim and what defines an Islamic

experience? Is there an American Islam? Who represents Islam in America? What are

media representations of African American Muslim Communities?

  1. What are the relationships with other Muslim and non-Muslim religious communities?

What are the bases for these relationships? Are African American Muslims involved in

inter-faith dialogues and if so, on what terms? What is the status of engagement with the

immigrant Muslim community?

  1. Is there a “gender jihad” as expressed by Amina Wadud? Where does knowledge

lay among the women? Are there issues of knowledge and power in marriage and family

construction? What are women contributing to art, music, scholarship? Is there meaningful

participation in the masajid? How are women shaping the activities of the masjid or other

distinctly Muslim spaces?

  1. What is the African American Muslim agenda for the 21st century? Do they have the

same issues of Islamophobia, curtailment of civil liberties? How is American Islam going to

be reflective of African American Islamic perspectives?

This Handbook will be published by Oxford in 2014. Those agreeing to submit a chapter

will receive a contract with Oxford and a cash or book honorarium. Please send me your

inquiries and hopefully willingness to submit by March 15, 2012 at amccloud@depaul.edu .


Calls for participants


UCL’s Dr Myriam Hunter-Henin is pleased to announce a workshop to be held at UCL on

12th June 2012 on Negotiating Religion Workshop: Legal Framework – Schools and

Religious Freedom

This one day workshop, which is part of the Negotiating Religion Workshop Series, will look

at how and to what extent do legal frameworks – judicial reasoning and legal processes –

allow space for negotiating religious issues. The workshop will look at questions such as:

  • Does this negotiation take place with religious communities or directly with the individuals who claim that their religious freedoms have been infringed?
  • What are the main actors of the negotiating process?
  • Who benefits from it?
  • What are the risks of ‘negotiating’?
  • Is ‘negotiation’ the best way to reach a fair compromise between conflicting rights and claims?
  • Is negotiating with religious freedoms any different to negotiation in respect of other human rights?
  • What special features/dangers derive from the school context in which this negotiation takes place?
  • What does teaching in a secular institution imply?

These crucial questions will be addressed through analysis of topical case law and legal

scholarship under four headings:

  1. Religious symbols

  2. Religious education and teaching content

  3. Religion and staff

  4. Faith Schools

You can book online for this conference at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/religion

The cost to attend is:

£60 – standard ticket

£30 – academic ticket

£10 – student ticket


Complete information about the Religion in Pieces conference in Providence next month is now available on our website.  The main conference page  can be found at http://socamr.wikispaces.com/ReligioninPieces.  From there you can find the program, as well as registration and hotel information.  We have reserved a block of rooms at the Hampton Inn nearby with a reduced rate; the rate expires on April 18th, so make your reservations before then.

The conference will begin with a keynote address by Chris Faraone of the University of Chicago at 7 pm on Friday, April 27, and will continue with one and a half days of papers ranging from ancient Israel to Late Antiquity.


Faith in Research  conference will be held on Wednesday 9th May 2012 at The Mothers’ Union, 24 Tufton Street, London, SW1P 3RB in conjunction with the Research and Statistics department of the Archbishops’ Council and the Oxford Centre for Ecclesiology & Practise Theology.

The event is designed for those who explore current research in ministry and mission. Cost is £45 to include a buffet lunch (£20 for unsalaried postgraduate students.)

To see the programme and access a booking form click:

http://www.churchofengland.org/about-us/facts-stats/research-statistics.aspx


Black Church Activism and Contested Multiculturalism in Europe, North America, and Africa

Birkbeck, University of London, May 29-30, 2012

This conference, which is part of an annual Transatlantic Roundtable on Religion and Race, will bring together academics, church leaders, students, and community activists to explore the role that churches play in the construction of identities in societies where issues of race and ethnicity are played out in the public sphere.  Approximately fifty panelists from the U.K., France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Nigeria, South Africa, Canada, and the U.S. are scheduled to present papers on various topics related to the conference theme.

Keynote Speakers

Anthony G. Reddie, Carol B. Duncan, Allan Boesak

Venue: Room B36 main campus Malet Street, Bloomsbury London WC1E 7HX

       http://www.bbk.ac.uk/maps

Registration:  The general registration price of 70 GBP (110 USD) (and the student price of 35 GBP/55 USD) includes the conference program pack, as well as lunch and morning and afternoon refreshments both days. Registration can be completed at the following website: https://www2.bbk.ac.uk/bih/blackchurches.html.

Conference hotels include the Tavistock Hotel– http://www.imperialhotels.co.uk/ and YHA, Travel lodge Euston (and other options near the college, see here:  http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bih/lcts/accommodation

             Contacts:

William Ackah, w.ackah@bbk.ac.uk; R. Drew Smith, rsmith@morehouse.edu; Rothney Tshaka, tshakrs@unisa.ac.za


Fellowships


  1. 2013-2014 Fellowship Award Announcement: School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton,

NJ, invites about twenty scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue

their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science,

law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with

an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy,

literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of

application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground

for roughly half the scholars; for 2013-2014 the focus will be The Environmental Turn

and the Human Sciences. The application deadline is November 1, 2012. Applications

must be submitted through the Institute’s online application system, which can be found,

along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu/applications


  1. UC Berkeley Institute of East Asian Studies Residential Faculty Research grants, 2012-13

The Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at UC Berkeley is pleased to announce the

second year of the IEAS Residential Faculty Research program, funded by a multi-

year grant. This initiative creates a resident research community to engage in research

projects concerning East Asia. Five themes, broadly defined, have been identified for the

purpose of organizing research. Using these themes to set general emphasis, the IEAS

invites Berkeley and non-Berkeley faculty members and scholars in all stages of their

careers to submit research proposals grounded in any discipline in the humanities and

social sciences (see Eligibility below). These proposals should be of East Asian content or relevance. Successful applicants will receive support to pursue independent research

while in residence in Berkeley. They are expected to make at least one presentation

on individual research topic during the course of a semester and to attend discussion

meetings. These meetings may be open to visiting scholars, doctoral candidates and

graduate students at Berkeley. The objective of the program is to facilitate the creation

of clusters of researchers who engage in conversations with each other while actively

pursuing individual research. All projects funded under the program are expected to

result in publications in English.

Awards will range from $10,000 (for one semester) to $20,000 (for two semesters), to

$25,000 (for a full year) and may be used for any purpose that is consistent with UC

research policy. Funded activities may begin as early as July 1, 2012.

Full details including the themes, process, deadlines etc: http://ieas.berkeley.edu/

resources/residential_faculty_grants.html


Scholarships


PhD and MA Jameel Scholarships, Islam-UK Centre, Cardiff University

With the help of a very generous gift to the University, the PhD and MA Jameel Scholarships

have been established to enable the very best students to come to Cardiff – those who

have the intellect and determination to apply their knowledge for the benefit of Muslim

communities in the UK, and to promote better understanding of Islam in wider society.

Applications are invited for 3 fully-funded PhD Jameel Scholarships, and 4 fully-funded MA

Jameel Scholarships (available for the forthcoming academic year on the MA in Islam in

Contemporary Britain).

For eligibility criteria, and details about the Scholarship packages, please go to:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/share/research/centres/csi/scholarships/index.html


Two fully funded positions in medieval history are now available at the University of Amsterdam in connection with a project examining Jerusalem as a holy site for Christians by the medieval Franciscan Order:

http://www.uva.nl/vacatures/vacatures.cfm/54A2240A-8E46-42E5-91474806E5ED89C6

Ideal candidates may come from a medieval history background, but the fields of art history, religion, literature, and archaeology are equally germane so long as candidates are able to access Latin and other medieval texts.


New Masters Programme (Groningen)


Registration for the four new Master programs in the study of religion at the University of Groningen is now open. The deadline for application for EU students is 15 May 2012. I would be grateful if you could forward this information to students who might be interested in the program, either in its one-year version or in its two-years version (Research Master).

The University of Groningen offers the following programs in the study of religion, all of them newly designed:

1. Religion, Conflict and Globalisation

2. Concealed Knowledge: Gnosticism, Esotericism and Mysticism

3. Origins of Abrahamic Religions: Texts and Contexts

4. Religion and the Public Domain