Roundtable: Building an Academic Career

During her recent trip to the UK, the Religious Studies Project managed (with the promise of copious Pink Gin) to persuade Professor Carole Cusack to take part in a roundtable discussion. She suggested that we discuss how to build an academic career – advice which she has been generous with to many people in the past. That having been agreed, ...
academia
advice
Career
Carole Cusack
Christopher Cotter
Conferences
David Robertson
Jonathan Tuckett
Journals
Kevin Whitesides
louise connelly
networking
Publishing
teaching

Editors' Picks 4: The Secularisation Thesis

In this, the penultimate Editors' Pick, David tells us why he chose his interview with Linda Woodhead on the Secularisation thesis as his favourite. The secularisation thesis – the idea that traditional religions are in terminal decline in the industrialised world – was perhaps the central debate in the sociology of religion in the second half of the 20th century.
David Robertson
lancaster
Linda Woodhead
religion and society
Religious Decline
Secularization

Editors' Picks 3: Jay Demerath on Functionalist Religion and the Substantive Sacred

Week three of our Editors' Picks. Chris tells us why he (and his fiancée) liked Jay Demerath's interview on substantive and functionalist definitions of religion. Could the difficulties associated with the academic conceptualisation of “religion” be overcome by changing our focus instead to “the sacred”?
Christopher Cotter
functionalist
jay demerath
sacralization
Sacred
Secularization
Sociology
substantive

Editors' Picks 2: The Phenomenology of Religion

The second of our Editors' Picks "repodcasts", and this time Jonathan has chosen our interview with James Cox on the Phenomenology of Religion. It was, incidentally, also our very first podcast, originally broadcast on the 14th of January, 2012. Jonathan also wrote the response to this interview, entitled “What is Phenomenology?“.
Cognition
edinburgh
James Cox
Phenomenology
podcasts

Editors' Picks 1: Losing Religion

In this, the first of four summer break Editor's Picks "repodcasts", Louise Connelly reintroduces Chris's interview with Callum Brown, first broadcast on 30/4/2012. How can we use historical approaches in the study of religion? More specifically, can we use historical approaches to understand why people are losing it? Professor Callum Brown tells us why historical approaches have much to tell us about religious change.
callum brown
editors picks
History
louise connelly
multidisciplinary
quantitative
statistics

Roundtable: Critics or Caretakers?

This discussion brings together a number of aspiring academics to reflect on some of the issues brought up in a recent podcast in a friendly and hilarious manner. The question cuts to the core of what academics who study religion are doing… are they taking care of religion? Are they antagonising it? What should they be doing? And judging by the various long tangents through which discussion meanders, the question certainly sparked our interest.
Anna Clot i Garrell
anthropology
Caretakers
Christopher Cotter
Critics
David Robertson
Ethan Quillen
Jonathan Tuckett
Katie Aston
religion
Sociology
Ting Guo

Should Scholars of Religion be Critics or Caretakers?

The inspiration for this episode came from one of Russell McCutcheon's works which we had encountered through the undergraduate Religious Studies programme at the University of Edinburgh, entitled 'Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion'. The result is this compilation of differing opinions and interpretations ...
academia
Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi
Eileen Barker
Ethics
grace davie
jolyon mitchell
Linda Woodhead
lois lee
psychology
religion
Religious Studies
russell mccutcheon
Sociology
steven sutcliffe
Theology
theory
timothy fitzgerald

Religion as Vestigial States

. In this interview Professor Goldenberg takes us through the idea that religions might be vestigial states. She argues that religions are formed in distinction to governmental ‘States’ and represent the last vestiges of the previous order. At the same time this is a maneuver on the part of those States to delineate spheres of power. A vestigial state is both a once and future state, ...
critical religion
gender
Islam
Jonathan Tuckett
Naomi Goldenberg
psychology
religion
timothy fitzgerald

David Voas on Quantitative Research

Sociological research has followed two broad paradigms – qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative studies seek depth, typically based on interviews and observation with a relatively small pool of subjects. Quantitative studies, on the other hand, survey a larger pool – in some cases, such as the UK National Census, practically the entire population of a country – relying on mass methods such as questionnaires with a limited set of questions and responses.
David Robertson
David Voas
quantitative
Sociology

Vernacular Religion

Images of Jesus on a slice of toast; Koran verses in an aubergine; statues which cry blood; Angel Colour cards and Atlantean crystal therapies; popular religious expressions are everywhere. In this interview, Marion Bowman showcases her fascinating research into the ways in which religion permeates everyday life, paying particular attention to the manifestations at the famous Glastonbury Festival.
David Robertson
glastonbury
marion bowman
religion
Spirituality
vernacular religion

Titus Hjelm on Marxist Approaches to the Study of Religions

"The foundation of irreligious criticism is: Man makes religion, religion does not make man. Religion is indeed the self-consciousness and self-esteem of man who has either not yet won through to himself or has already lost himself again. But man is no abstract being squatting outside the world. Man is the world of man, state, society. This state and this society produce religion, ...
David Robertson
marx
post-structuralist
Sociology
SOCREL
titus hjelm

Ariela Keysar on "What does 'belief' mean to Americans?"

'Belief' lies at the core of E.B. Tylor's canonical definition of religion as belief in 'spiritual beings'. However, in the last decades of the twentieth century the concept became unfashionable in the social sciences, with scholars from all parts of the world denouncing its centrality as a Western, Protestant bias which has limited application to other religions. Ariela Keysar disagrees...
Abby Day
America
Ariela Keysar
ARIS
belief
Christopher Cotter
ISSSC
quantitative
religion
Unites States

'Religion' and Mystification

In this interview, Timothy Fitzgerald presents his critical deconstruction of religion as a powerful discourse and its parasitic relation to ‘secular’ categories such as politics and economics. Religion is not a stand-alone category, he argues; ‘religions’ are modern inventions which are made to appear ubiquitous and, by being removed to a marginal, ...
categories
critical religion
Jonathan Tuckett
mystification
podcasts
religion
Religious Studies
stirling
timothy fitzgerald

Roundtable: Should Religious Studies be Multidisciplinary?

Ninian Smart was a proponent of the idea that Religious Studies should be "poly-methodical"; but should Religious Studies as a discipline incorporate theories and methodologies from multiple other disciplines, such as sociology, anthropology or history? When RS departments have run on an interdisciplinary basis, have they been successful?
Elizabeth Ursic
Ethan Quillen
Jonathan Tuckett
Kevin Whitesides
Krittika Bhattacharjee
Liam Sutherland
Maegan gilliland
multidisciplinary
ninian smart
roundtable

Tariq Modood on the Crisis of European Secularism

Secularism - the separation of religion and state - has been a central narrative in the European political sphere since the Enlightenment. But with renewed calls in some countries to affirm a Christian identity, and problems in accommodating some Muslim communities, is Western secularism under threat?
David Robertson
europe
podcasts
Secularism
SOCREL
tariq modood