About this episode

This decade’s first episode of Discourse! is hosted by Vivian Asimos, with guests Aled Thomas and Michael Munnick. This time, the theme is “communication” – fittingly enough. The conversation covers stories about different models of Christianity among evangelical Trump supporters, the recent resurgence of the use of “cult” in popular media, Greta Thunberg as a charismatic leader and media’s downplaying of Islamic Solidarity in the Gambian justice minister’s genocide charge at the UN against Myanmar.

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