About this episode

Welcome to a brand new Patron-only series here at the RSP – Are You My Data? We asked our patrons what they would ask Carole Cusack of the University of Sydney, if they could ask her anything. This is the result! Questions include: what does an hour in your classroom look like? How many academic children do you have? Any advice for Early Career scholars? How do you manage to produce so much? And much more. Coming soon: Russell McCutcheon. We’re closed for questions this time, but watch out for the next call…

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Music forcefully reminds us of religion’s timebound nature and holds its own systems of rhythm and inflection—you cannot skim music the way you can cram a text.
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Are we to believe those mountains weren’t here before humans came to name them?! Mountains, dammit! They’re real and they’re mind-independent! (It’s at this point that the radical constructionists ask, “can you say that without discourse?” and then the realists really go apoplectic.) Titus Hjelm’s book Social Constructionisms: Approaches to the Study of the Human World is a fantastic introduction to the topic of “social constructionism.”
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It seems to me to be perfectly possible for someone to agree on the problem of representation, highlight the importance of reflecting on the situatedness of observer, challenge essentialism and still show no particular interest in problematizing analytical definitions of religion. There is more than one discursive approach in religious studies. In his interview with the RSP, professor Kocku von Stuckrad outlines some of the key issues that are relevant for constructing a discourse theoretical framework for religious studies.

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