Discussing Pious Fashion and Muslim Dress Beyond the Headscarf (Classroom)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this discussion, we cover some key terms from Bucar’s book, such as what Pious Fashion is, why it might be defined that way, and how it helps further a conversation about Muslim women beyond the veil. We discuss the differences in performing fieldwork for this project in Iran, Indonesia, and Turkey. Connecting this research to Islamophobia and Muslim experience in America, Liz Bucar reflects on how modesty has become more mainstream.

Challenges and Responsibilities for the Public Scholar of Religion

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Thomas Coleman III
In this interview, Megan Goodwin examines the current state of public religious studies scholarship. “Public scholar” has become a buzzword in some corners of the discipline of religious studies, variously referring to scholars who share their research to a broader audience on social media platforms, in popular media outlets, or through multimedia such as podcasts and online video. As more scholars have entered these ranks, the broader field has taken notice.

LDS Garments and Agency (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
A candid discussion with Nancy Ross about Mormon women's experiences with wearing LDS garments. From the paper "LDS Garments and Agency: A Qualitative Study of Meaning" by Nancy Ross and Jessica Finnigan: "The form of LDS garments has changed over time, from wrist-to-ankle, single-piece long underwear, to versions that included short sleeves and legs, to the two-piece styles that are common today. One of the most difficult aspects of studying garments is that talking about them is a transgressive act." This is that boundary pushing discussion.

Discourse #6, March Edition: With Joel Ritala, Jarno Sandberg, Anton Stranden, and Martta Tenhu

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Thomas Coleman III
This special edition of #Discourse was recorded at the University of Helsinki in mid-February, with Chris and Study of Religion students Joel Ritala, Jarno Sandberg, Anton Stranden and Martta Tenhu. Topics covered include conspiracy theories, the entanglement of 'religion' in education and festive celebrations in Finland and the UK, the first amendment of the United States constitution, and a controversial conversion in the Netherlands.

Religion and Multiculturalism in Canada and Beyond (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
Dr. Wendy Fletcher is the co-author of "Space for Race: Decoding…

Christian Beauty Pageants: Beauty is in the eye of the creator (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
By comparing the Miss Christian America pageant to other more well known pageants Miss USA and Miss America, Chelsea's study provides a look at the intersections between religion, gender, and collective identity. Using Christian Smith's ideas of subcultural identity, Belanger examines how the structure of the Miss Christian pageant helps develop a unique form of embodied religion.

Discourse #5, February Edition: With Irene Oh and Carolyn Davis

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Thomas Coleman III
On this month's episode of Discourse, Dr. Irene Oh (Director of the Peace Studies Program, George Washington University) and Dr. Carolyn Davis (independent consultant) spoke with Ben Marcus about a few key stories in religion and public life from February.
adoption
Catholicism
civil rights
Ilhan Omar
Islam
LGBT rights
pop culture
Religious freedom
U.S. Supreme Court

Melodies of Change: Music and Progressive Judaism (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
From piyyutim to zemirot to Yeshiva acapella groups in the United States, the use of music in the Jewish faith is numerous and varied. In this interview, Breann Fallon of the Sydney Jewish Museum chats to Dr Ruth Illman of Åbo Akademi University and Uppsala Universityi n about her research on the role of music as an agent of change within the progressive Jewish community in London that appears in her most recent monograph Music and Religious Change among Progressive Jews in London: Being Liberal and Doing Traditional.

America’s Dark Theologian Stephen King: A Religious Imagination Explored (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this podcast, Carmen Celestini speaks with Dr. Douglas Cowan on his newest book exploring the religious imagination of Stephen King through his horror novels. Cowan is well known for his research in the area of religion and pop culture through analysis of films and literature. The discussion focuses not only on Stephen King but the process of deciphering the religious motifs within King’s work, and the importance of this work to religious studies.

Slenderman and online mythology (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this podcast, Ross Downing discusses personal and communal narratives, online mythology and the grey areas between religion and media with Vivian Asimos. Miss Asimos’ work has investigated the potentiality of video games as contemporary mythology in popular culture. In the broader context of BASR 2018, the overall theme of boundaries and categories is explored and the possible insights online movements can yield in the perception and application of theories of religion.

The Study of Religion and National Identity in Estonia (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
Estonia, the northernmost of the Baltic states, has a reputation of being one of the most secularized countries in Europe. Although the visibility of religion is rising, being ‘not religious’ is still considered normative. Estonia is a context in which notions and debates on religion, atheism, and indifference are interrelated in complex ways with the history of Estonian nationalism, and two foreign religious-secular regimes: German Lutheran and Soviet Atheism. In this interview, Chris and Atko Remmel discuss why the Estonian context is – or should be – interesting to scholars of ‘religion’. What happened during the Soviet era? What about the academic study of religion in Estonia?

Religion as a Tactic of Governance (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this interview recorded at the BASR/ISASR, Naomi Goldenberg considers how ‘religion’ has developed as a separate sphere from ‘governance’. She argues that ‘religion’ has been projected onto the past for strategic purposes, as a management technique, or even alternative to violence. How does viewing religions as “restive once-and-future governments” help us understand the functioning of this category in contemporary discourse?

The Therwil Affair: Handshakes in Swiss Schools (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this podcast, taking place on the last day of the Annual EASR…

Discourse #3: Essi Mäkelä and Benjamin Marcus

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Thomas Coleman III
Welcome to the third issue of “Discourse”, where our editors…

Negotiating Gender in Contemporary Occultism (Classroom Edit)

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Thomas Coleman III
In this interview conducted at the 2018 EASR conference in Bern,…