Entries by Jonathan Tuckett

Religion and its Publics (Part 2)

In the last feature of the “semester” we’re continuing with the video format. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. I went about asking the pundits a couple of questions about Religion and its Publics. This week we have the second question (link for Part 1 in the sidebar).

Putting an Umbrella Over a Bridge

Author’s cat demonstrating the utility of having an overarching framework for discussing topics pertinent to religious studies within interdisciplinary contexts.

Trying to squeeze “(non)religious and/or (non)spiritual identifications, beliefs, and/or practices are important to [psychology topic] because…” into a 150-word abstract for a conference paper is cumbersome, at best.

Sounds of the Underground

Owen Coggins’ RSP interview for his book(Mysticism, Ritual and Religion in Drone Metal) affords an opportunity to pick up on some areas that he mentions, that really are not engaged with enough in the more dominant discourses surrounding the study of religion. Specifically the embodied nature of aspects of what might be considered “religious”

Religious cliché and stigma

As part of the podcast on pervasive clichés, Chris Cotter interviews Brad Stoddard and Craig Martin regarding their recent work how popular clichés are enculturated within our culture. This conversation explores how clichés are both useful and detrimental to the study of religion in that they frame expectations about religion and speak to the social expectations of religious groups by others.

Religion and its Publics (Part 1)

This week we’ve got something a little different for the Features segment. A couple of months ago the RSP attended the Open University’s conference on Contemporary Religion in Historical Perspectives. We thought this would be a great opportunity to do another RSP video!

Shall we play the game?

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is something which I have been commenting upon since and constitutes the core of one of my arguments about what it is to do “social science” in my forthcoming The Idea of a Genuine Social Science (Springer, 2018).

This-Lifers and Afterlifers

It’s some time since I talked with my namesake Douglas Ezzy so it’s good to have this chance to pick up some of his points even though Tasmania may not be the perfect location to boomerang something back to him from Durham UK. Good, too, since my more frequent friendly chats with Allan Kellehear find some echo in that conversation.

A student response to “Hinduism”

This week we’re doing some a little different with the format of the response. Rather than have a single respondent to the interview, we opened up the opportunity to several students from the University of Edinburgh’s Religious Studies Masters program to have a stab at writing their own.

Blended/ing Religion

Margarita Simon Guillory’s interview presents me with an opportunity to revisit a major question in the study of African American religion(s). That is: How do we name and theorize the practice of combining different belief systems to create a unique new religion?

Re-Packaging E.B. Tylor

It is a rather odd experience to be writing a response to a podcast in which I participated, along with Graham Harvey, Paul François Tremlett, James Cox, Miguel Astor-Aguilera and Jonathan Jong. This was a roundtable discussion held at the 2017 British Association for the Study of Religion…

Engaging with Religion and Populism

In Professor Brian S. Turner’s RSP podcast interview with Sammy Bishop, a rallying cry for the relevance of sociology of religion rang out. In the aftermath of 9/11, it was the rush to understand Islamic terrorism that re-centred the study of religion in the social sciences. Now, Turner argues,…