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Scholars in dialogue with our weekly podcast

Scholars in Dialogue with our weekly podcast

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The Now of Digital Humanities in Religious Studies

Responding to our interview with Chris Cantwell and Kristian Petersen, Jeri E. Wieringa builds on the conversations of research evaluation and sustainability issues in digital humanities projects and unpacks what is at stake in how we define DH work and projects.

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The Importance and Challenges of the Digital Humanities

In this response, Isaac Weiner builds on the discussions in our recent interview with Chris Cantwell and Kristian Petersen by exploring how scholars can work to make digital humanities projects more accessible, how we can avoid exploiting the labor of early career scholars, and how we can take the affective experience of these projects into consideration.

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Reflections on “Religious Racism”

Responding to our interview with Danielle N. Boaz, J. Brent Crosson reflects on when and how African diaspora practices are classified as “religion” or “witchcraft” and unpacks the socio-legal effects of these categorizations.

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Getting Less Precious About Parish Studies

Susan Bigelow Reynolds, in her response to our Season 10 episode with Alyssa Maldonado-Estrada, calls attention to how Catholic devotionalism is frequently essentialized and limited in its understanding. She argues instead for a “more expansive consideration” of Catholic ritual ecology.

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Climate strike in Melbourne, AUS. Person holding sign with Simpson's quote "Won't somebody please think of the children!"

The Cycle of Conspiracy Theories

In his response to our interview with Carmen Celestini, Raymond Radford builds on Celestini’s discussion of conspiracy theories as “history repeated” in his analysis of social responses to pandemics “then and now.”

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“A Jesus Before Paul?”

Kicking off our Season 11 Response essays, Robyn Faith Walsh builds on Willi Braun’s discussion of the emphasis on origins in New Testament studies to explore the strategic use and employment of Paul’s letters in the history of Christianity.

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On Tantra, Jain Style

“The story that Dr. Gough is telling about the development of Jain tantra—the Jain adoption of mantra-practice, but rejection of antinomianism—thus seems to me to be a fundamentally noteworthy case-study,” writes Anne Mocko on our interview with Ellen Gough discussing the ‘tantricization’ of Jain ascetic rituals.

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The views expressed in podcasts, features and responses are the views of the individual contributors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Religious Studies Project or our sponsors. The Religious Studies Project is produced by the Religious Studies Project Association (SCIO), a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (charity number SC047750).